Ordering experience/please help me decide 2.0 ecoboost vs 2.5 hybrid

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I made a pro/con, thanks for the suggestion. Thought I'd elaborate more on the purpose this truck will serve first.

Will be our family's second car and mostly second choice when all 4 of us are together. I make frequent trips to the transfer station with demolition/yard debris/old appliances, etc. I'm a DIYer, so frequent trips to home improvement stores for lumber and materials. We own two 12' kayaks, so we'd be either loading them up top with a truck rack or pulling behind in a trailer. I'm also planning on getting a hitch mounted bike rack. No off roading, but likely driving on some dirt/loose gravel roads to get to some off the beaten path paddling and fishing spots.

2.5 Hybrid PRO
~$3,300 cost savings right away
-Up to $500 cost savings per year * I don't put a lot of miles on my cars
-Good warranty on ECVT power train
~$10,000 less expensive than a nicely equipped '22 Frontier *based on Frontier's estimated MSRP

2.5 Hybrid CON
-Maybe underpowered for my usage *This can't be determined until we get to actually drive one
-No AWD option *Will hurt resale, being in upstate NY many buyers want this feature in an SUV/truck
-Only Ford can work on hybrid engine

2.0 Ecoboost PRO
-Should be plenty capable for my usage
-AWD will be useful for unpaved/unloved roads
-1 inch more rear legroom for child seats *not very important but it's a difference between the two options
-Still ~$7,500 less expensive than a nicely equipped '22 Frontier *based on Frontier's estimated MSRP
-Will likely be easier to sell when the time comes

2.0 Ecoboost CON
~$3,300 upfront higher cost
-Will spend approximately $500 more in fuel each year. *equates to $5,000 over 10 years
 

technolithic

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I made a pro/con, thanks for the suggestion. Thought I'd elaborate more on the purpose this truck will serve first.

Will be our family's second car and mostly second choice when all 4 of us are together. I make frequent trips to the transfer station with demolition/yard debris/old appliances, etc. I'm a DIYer, so frequent trips to home improvement stores for lumber and materials. We own two 12' kayaks, so we'd be either loading them up top with a truck rack or pulling behind in a trailer. I'm also planning on getting a hitch mounted bike rack. No off roading, but likely driving on some dirt/loose gravel roads to get to some off the beaten path paddling and fishing spots.

2.5 Hybrid PRO
~$3,300 cost savings right away
-Up to $500 cost savings per year * I don't put a lot of miles on my cars
-Good warranty on ECVT power train
~$10,000 less expensive than a nicely equipped '22 Frontier *based on Frontier's estimated MSRP

2.5 Hybrid CON
-Maybe underpowered for my usage *This can't be determined until we get to actually drive one
-No AWD option *Will hurt resale, being in upstate NY many buyers want this feature in an SUV/truck
-Only Ford can work on hybrid engine

2.0 Ecoboost PRO
-Should be plenty capable for my usage
-AWD will be useful for unpaved/unloved roads
-1 inch more rear legroom for child seats *not very important but it's a difference between the two options
-Still ~$7,500 less expensive than a nicely equipped '22 Frontier *based on Frontier's estimated MSRP
-Will likely be easier to sell when the time comes

2.0 Ecoboost CON
~$3,300 upfront higher cost
-Will spend approximately $500 more in fuel each year. *equates to $5,000 over 10 years
It's great to see the pros/cons all laid out, thanks! Unfortunately I'm still undecided... haha. Either configuration is a bargain, but the wild value of the hybrid is so alluring.
 

Gray Beard

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I made a pro/con, thanks for the suggestion. Thought I'd elaborate more on the purpose this truck will serve first.

Will be our family's second car and mostly second choice when all 4 of us are together. I make frequent trips to the transfer station with demolition/yard debris/old appliances, etc. I'm a DIYer, so frequent trips to home improvement stores for lumber and materials. We own two 12' kayaks, so we'd be either loading them up top with a truck rack or pulling behind in a trailer. I'm also planning on getting a hitch mounted bike rack. No off roading, but likely driving on some dirt/loose gravel roads to get to some off the beaten path paddling and fishing spots.

2.5 Hybrid PRO
~$3,300 cost savings right away
-Up to $500 cost savings per year * I don't put a lot of miles on my cars
-Good warranty on ECVT power train
~$10,000 less expensive than a nicely equipped '22 Frontier *based on Frontier's estimated MSRP

2.5 Hybrid CON
-Maybe underpowered for my usage *This can't be determined until we get to actually drive one
-No AWD option *Will hurt resale, being in upstate NY many buyers want this feature in an SUV/truck
-Only Ford can work on hybrid engine

2.0 Ecoboost PRO
-Should be plenty capable for my usage
-AWD will be useful for unpaved/unloved roads
-1 inch more rear legroom for child seats *not very important but it's a difference between the two options
-Still ~$7,500 less expensive than a nicely equipped '22 Frontier *based on Frontier's estimated MSRP
-Will likely be easier to sell when the time comes

2.0 Ecoboost CON
~$3,300 upfront higher cost
-Will spend approximately $500 more in fuel each year. *equates to $5,000 over 10 years
Nice job laying this out, it aligns pretty closely with my own views but still can’t decide. Will just have to wait to drive and see how it feels.
 

fishinmagician

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I'm waiting for the mpg to be released and able to test drive before I decide
 

Wanted33

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Thank you for that bit of insider information. I'll probably continue to mull this over for a bit. If I do end up wanting to change my build and it's too late, I'll just have to live with that.

I am truly hyped for this truck and it checks a lot of my boxes either way.
Casey, go with your gut. Think about it, deep down inside you know which engine you want. I went through the same motions trying to decide which engine I wanted in my Bronco, 2.3L or 2.7L. I started with the 2.7L just like you started with the 2.0L. Back, and forth I went, got all kinds of opinions, some helpful, some no so helpful. Then it just dawned on me that I wanted the 2.7L, and if I went with the 2.3L I would always be second guessing myself. I've done that second guessing with a new F-150. The entire time I owned that truck I never really liked it, because I picked the wrong engine. I finally gave up, and ordered another F-150 with the engine I should I gotten in the first place. Good luck on your decision.
 

Barefootdan

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I made a pro/con, thanks for the suggestion. Thought I'd elaborate more on the purpose this truck will serve first.

Will be our family's second car and mostly second choice when all 4 of us are together. I make frequent trips to the transfer station with demolition/yard debris/old appliances, etc. I'm a DIYer, so frequent trips to home improvement stores for lumber and materials. We own two 12' kayaks, so we'd be either loading them up top with a truck rack or pulling behind in a trailer. I'm also planning on getting a hitch mounted bike rack. No off roading, but likely driving on some dirt/loose gravel roads to get to some off the beaten path paddling and fishing spots.

2.5 Hybrid PRO
~$3,300 cost savings right away
-Up to $500 cost savings per year * I don't put a lot of miles on my cars
-Good warranty on ECVT power train
~$10,000 less expensive than a nicely equipped '22 Frontier *based on Frontier's estimated MSRP

2.5 Hybrid CON
-Maybe underpowered for my usage *This can't be determined until we get to actually drive one
-No AWD option *Will hurt resale, being in upstate NY many buyers want this feature in an SUV/truck
-Only Ford can work on hybrid engine

2.0 Ecoboost PRO
-Should be plenty capable for my usage
-AWD will be useful for unpaved/unloved roads
-1 inch more rear legroom for child seats *not very important but it's a difference between the two options
-Still ~$7,500 less expensive than a nicely equipped '22 Frontier *based on Frontier's estimated MSRP
-Will likely be easier to sell when the time comes

2.0 Ecoboost CON
~$3,300 upfront higher cost
-Will spend approximately $500 more in fuel each year. *equates to $5,000 over 10 years
What is the 1” extra rear legroom for child seats? I didn’t know there was interior differences between the two options (besides the 12v battery location)
 
OP
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The battery in the hybrid is under the rear seats, so there's no storage under the passenger side rear seat. This also results in 1 inch less legroom back there. Not a big deal since 36" is still a lot even compared to midsize trucks.
 

theek

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not just more fun, but far more capable at better entry price point than any mid size truck out there. Also, we are retired and don't drive the standard assumption of 10-15k miles per year. My 2013 Jeep GC has 52k, my wife's 2014 Outback has 32k, our 2018 F-150 has 12k. Our longest drives are ~2k miles 1-2 times per year per vehicle. Using my wife's Subi as sample calculator since she bought it after retiring, our daily drivers probably average 4571 miles per year. I'm 63 with life expectancy to 83. This Maverick will replace my Jeep as daily driver, so I'll maybe have 91,420 miles on the Mav by the time I die or can't drive anymore. Powertrain warranty will cover 1st 5 years and those turbos will outlive me :ROFLMAO:
I work at home. My drives are errands, my cottage, hikes with dogs, visiting my older kids or hauling their crap when they move.

The CRV has great fuel economy. It doesn't tow. It's also a slug at 150hp especially when loaded.

Remember payload. It is easy to overload a Honda CRV's 890lbs.

For a young person who doesn't own a place on a mountain road? FWD Hybrid all the way. Use it as a bike hauler and on cycling holidays with friends.

For us it's different.

We thought about car sharing or rental cars for weekends or when we need a second car. It doesn't work financially. Car and truck rentals are now very expensive and car sharing does Prius not trucks.

This will be our only tow vehicle for a small boat and utility trailers, our haul crap to the dump vehicle, and with FX4 our means to the cottage a few times in winter. The last vehicle that has any of these capabilities was a basic minivan, and that cost me 30K Canadian in 2006. In 2022 I'm paying 38K for a far more capable and safer vehicle.

We will probably give the CRV to the youngest when he goes to university and replace that with an all electric city runabout.
 

Old Ranchero

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I made a pro/con, thanks for the suggestion. Thought I'd elaborate more on the purpose this truck will serve first.

Will be our family's second car and mostly second choice when all 4 of us are together. I make frequent trips to the transfer station with demolition/yard debris/old appliances, etc. I'm a DIYer, so frequent trips to home improvement stores for lumber and materials. We own two 12' kayaks, so we'd be either loading them up top with a truck rack or pulling behind in a trailer. I'm also planning on getting a hitch mounted bike rack. No off roading, but likely driving on some dirt/loose gravel roads to get to some off the beaten path paddling and fishing spots.

2.5 Hybrid PRO
~$3,300 cost savings right away
-Up to $500 cost savings per year * I don't put a lot of miles on my cars
-Good warranty on ECVT power train
~$10,000 less expensive than a nicely equipped '22 Frontier *based on Frontier's estimated MSRP

2.5 Hybrid CON
-Maybe underpowered for my usage *This can't be determined until we get to actually drive one
-No AWD option *Will hurt resale, being in upstate NY many buyers want this feature in an SUV/truck
-Only Ford can work on hybrid engine

2.0 Ecoboost PRO
-Should be plenty capable for my usage
-AWD will be useful for unpaved/unloved roads
-1 inch more rear legroom for child seats *not very important but it's a difference between the two options
-Still ~$7,500 less expensive than a nicely equipped '22 Frontier *based on Frontier's estimated MSRP
-Will likely be easier to sell when the time comes

2.0 Ecoboost CON
~$3,300 upfront higher cost
-Will spend approximately $500 more in fuel each year. *equates to $5,000 over 10 years
that $500.00 is also only $9.62 per week. Can't even get a Dominos Pizza for that. Keeping it in perspective, How much is your monthly cell phone plan? How about cable, internet, streaming services? Most everyone has a tight budget, especially a family of 4, but I'm guessing you wouldn't even be shopping for a new vehicle if $9.62 week was a deal breaker? Once you start loading people or things in the Maverick the MPG of that hybrid will be lower and being down by ~100HP to the 2.0L version performance loss will be noticeable. BTW: that Frontier is a mid size and using same V6 drivetrain as the current 2020/2021 models and gets worse MPG than the 2.0L/AWD .

Now we know Ford is targeting the entry level Hybrid as a replacement for any small car out there and people on a budget- especially young urban buyers, but IMO every other use case points to the 2.0L being the best bang for the buck and most useful with least negatives for pretty much everyone else.
 

JASmith

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The hybrid offers way better fuel economy, 87 vs 91 octane recommended, electric torque off the line with a smooth transmission that makes the most of the available horsepower (see below, above 30mph the difference between the 2.0T isn't as massive), better stop/start performance, quite a bit of savings up front, and long term the hybrid uses a naturally aspirated port injected engine that is tuned to never even go all the way up to redline so should last forever whereas the 2.0T ecoboost is not only going to have more frequent oil and spark plug changes and the like but being direct injection turbo is bound to eventually have the unavoidable carbon buildup on the valves requiring a tedious walnut blasting if you end up keeping the vehicle 100K+ miles. FWD tends to be more reliable than AWD, as there's less moving parts and sensors, and FWD with Blizzaks can often overall outperform AWD with old all seasons since AWD doesn't really help with braking and turning traction which winter tires do.
5C7FD18F-F470-419E-B9CC-9FB33FCDF964.jpeg
 

JASmith

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Once you start loading people or things in the Maverick the MPG of that hybrid will be lower and being down by ~100HP to the 2.0L version performance loss will be noticeable
Go to fuelly.org and look at those two powertrains on the Escape, which has been out since 2020, and you'll see that just isn't the case.

From the thousands of surveys, the hybrid averages 39mpg on 87 octane recommended and the 2.0T averages 26mpg on 91 octane recommended. Adjusting for octane pricing difference, that bumps the hybrid up around 12% higher effective mileage which would be 44mpg.

Most of your fuel usage is either from stop and go or from highway cruising, not from flooring it, and the 125hp electric motor with regenerative braking and a smoother stop/start experience should be much more efficient for that, and for the highway even fully loaded weight doesn't really matter much as its really more about aerodynamic drag and it takes only a small amount of horsepower for steady state cruising, not stressing either powertrain.

The eCVT as seen above also has higher "area under the curve" for horsepower than you'd think for its peak output, meaning its not as far behind the 250hp engine as you'd think on paper.

The only truly massive difference is below 30mph when flooring it, as around 20mph you can see the 2.0T/8-speed powertrain is putting down 230hp vs the hybrids 150hp, and a AWD will have a much better launch than FWD. So aside from a 0-60mph drag race though, if you're flooring it to pass on the highway or accelerating on an entrance ramp, I expect the hybrid to do quite well.

Easiest way to verify for yourself would be to go drive a Escape back to back right now with the two powertrains, it shouldn't feel that different in a Maverick body, as the Maverick chassis is based on the Escape anyway.
 

theek

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I'm in Ottawa where we get a lot of snow and ice. Front-wheel drive with snows is vastly inferior to AWD with snow tires especially going up snow-packed 20% grades.
 

Buzzard

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I'm a geezer and retired too. But if I was still young, (working/commuting) kids etc. I'd jumping on the high mileage hybrid. About the snow thing, yeah AWD can get you there but it really doesn't help you stop. Stopping is more important than going. FWD and good tires will do what is really needed under reasonable conditions.

Under unreasonable conditions stay home, or at work until the plows come by. Your biggest obligation is to your family. That means staying alive and not crashing your truck for something stupid. Good tires, FWD, slow and steady will get you there. I was police sergeant, the amount of winter accidents due to 4WD & AWD owners plowing through snow at speed because they could is amazing. It seems they never considered stopping or turning. I'd show up at the accident in a Chevy Caprice with RWD and snows. Go figure.
 

JASmith

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BTW, here's an article from MotorTrend comparing the powertrain options for the Escape on which the Maverick is based, and they indicate that the hybrid is the one to get: https://www.motortrend.com/news/2020-ford-escape-engine-options-pros-and-cons-comparison/

2.0-Liter 4-Cylinder EcoBoost: Pros
That extra grunt is immediately evident (compared to the three cylinder turbo). It simply makes the Escape feel quicker; less effort is needed to get the car up to speed. The numbers prove it, too, with a 6.9-second 0-60 mph run. An eight-speed automatic is the only transmission. However, all-wheel drive is standard, so traction is improved in slippery and loose conditions. It also enables some legitimate towing capability: up to 3,500 pounds.
2.0-Liter 4-Cylinder EcoBoost: Cons
The engine itself doesn't have much turbo lag, but the transmission needs time to think. It always shifts to the highest gear possible to save fuel, so when pressing the gas pedal, there's a delay as it decides which ratio is best for the situation. Reactions, then, aren't the best; the 2.0-liter EcoBoost might feel quicker but no sportier.

2.5-Liter Hybrid: Pros
It now features a compact, liquid-cooled 1.1-kW-hr battery pack to assist a 2.5-liter Atkinson-cycle I-4 engine linked to a CVT. Ford says the switch from air cooling allows the battery to be smaller yet more effectively implemented into the drive cycle. If you drive gently, the Escape Hybrid can operate on electric-only power and in the right circumstances will sustain speeds of up to 85 mph without the engine. But how does it drive? About as well as its EcoBoost counterparts—in fact, it's probably the Escape to get. The CVT might actually provide slightly better reactions than the oft-confused eight-speed. Brake pedal feel, a common gripe on hybrid vehicles, seems well sorted here; there's no awkward transition point between regenerative and friction brakes.
2.5-Liter Hybrid: Cons
Any smoothness the electric motor and CVT provide is undone by the Atkinson-cycle 2.5-liter engine. Of the three on offer, it seems the roughest and noisiest, slightly oxymoronic given the application. There's no denying performance is less than its turbocharged counterparts. With a combined output of 200 hp and 170 lb-ft of torque, it's down on power compared to the 2.0-liter turbo, and its 8.7-second 0-60 mph run is a blink behind the triple.

Video Demonstrations
Hybrid:
2.0 Ecoboost:
 
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