Mavonorder

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Yes the cost, lousy gas mileage and a timing belt is a turn off to me. Others have said what's the big deal replace the timing belt when it's due. I think it is a big deal. I have a 20 foot pontoon boat but ordered the 4k tow. Was wondering if the Hybrid could handle it especially at the launch ramp being fwd and all the weight on the back.
I'm the "same boat". (literally)😁. We have a 2015, 20 foot Harris pontoon with a 90 hp 4 stroke Yamaha and hope the Mav, xlt, tow, fx4 can pull it to (10 mile round trip which has 4 to 5, 20 to 40 foot hills to go up and down) and up the ramp about 12 to 15 times a year with no problems. I think the whole package weighs under 3500 lbs. And only the driver will be allowed to sit in the truck when it's being pulled up the boat ramp👍

 

samspritzer

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I always like Honda especially since we own a 2019 CRV and 2008 Accord but there simply is no comparison of the Maverick to the Ridgeline. The Ridgeline has always been compared to the Tacoma, Colorado and Ranger. And it should stay in that category. Check out Consumer Report's review of the 2021 version which is the same as 2022. In fact, the 2022 article does compare it to Maverick, Ranger and Santa Cruz. To me, that is really confusing.
 
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davnau

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I always like Honda especially since we own a 2019 CRV and 2008 Accord but there simply is no comparison of the Maverick to the Ridgeline. The Ridgeline has always been compared to the Tacoma, Colorado and Ranger. And it should stay in that category. Check out Consumer Report's review of the 2021 version which is the same as 2022. In fact, the 2022 article does compare it to Maverick, Ranger and Santa Cruz. To me, that is really confusing.
I think it goes to the fact there are only 2 compact trucks right now, plus CU does have some strange ideas sometimes.

In general, young autowriters and testers have no sense of automotive history. If a vehicle can only do 0-60 in 8 seconds, they think it’s barely adequate performance. Sheesh! My Maverick Hybrid is the fastest vehicle I’ve ever owned with all kinds of reserve power. I’m not into fast and loud but rather smooth and quiet. The Maverick has that in spades.

Visibility is great with no need for blind spot monitoring. Just turn around and quickly look, like it always used to be. Powet mirrors? I never miss them. As it is, I feel my Maverick XL Hybrid is totally loaded, and has more than enough features, for me. The Volvo C70 I just sold was totally loaded, but in actuality, overkill. I really don’t miss the soft Bridge of Weir Scottish leather heated seats. (Well, maybe a little.🤣)

Now if a buyer wants more, then by all means get it. But the base Maverick truck is just a huge value. CU should have pointed that out more, but then their recommendation for trim level is the XLT Lux. Fine, but not needed for me.

They considered the power seat essential. Why? The 6-way manual seat and standard tilt/tele wheel give so many driver positions. Heck, in the vast majority of the 38 cars I’ve owned, I was happy to have an adjustable seat back, and my first cars did not even have that. If the standard wheel and driving position did not fit me, I got a car that did.

My 1973 Mustang Convertible is pretty basic with a 250 6, C4 automatic, has standard power front disk brakes, the optional power steering, and no AC. The seats just go back and forth with no recline, let alone height adjustment. Cruise control was not even an option in 1973. Ford offered it as an option on the 1967-1970 Mustangs, but only a few hundred cars had that option ordered out of over a million sold for those years. So Ford dropped it for 1971. Nobody wanted it.

Everthing endlessly moves upscale over time. But how much is enough? My grandfather used to say that nobody has a U-Haul hitched up to the back of their hearse on the way to the cemetery. Everything is relative.

Enough life philosophy. Just enjoy your truck. And for those still waiting, you’ll like it when it eventually arrives. Just crazy times right now.
 
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uh50

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I
May I ask what problems you are referring to with the 2.0 EB motor? I'm in the market and doing research on the eb and hybrid.
My intention is not to cause concern for anyone that may want to buy a Maverick with the 2.0 EB. That's not the context of the post. You may want to do your own research. A quick internet search engine reveals far more than what is really important.

My research revealed that Ford's 2.0 EcoBoost direct injection engine does not have huge problems, but still, some car owners have reported some issues over the years of production. The one that concerned me was the integrated exhaust manifold design. The manifold is made of stainless steel and integrated directly into the cylinder head. Because of hi-temps and the heating/cooling cycle, the stainless steel exhaust manifold can develop hairline cracks. There operative word is can, not that it will. The issue is rare.

Remember, this same engine is used in the Edge, Escape/Ford Kuga, Explorer, Focus ST, Fusion, Taurus, Lincoln Corsair, Lincoln MKZ, and Lincoln Nautilus. The sheer numbers produced by Ford bogles my mind. Therefore, I must point out this engine has been operating for about 12 years now. Over the years, Ford modified it to make it better, and an excellent example is the 2nd generation engine that is in our Mavericks.

Let me ask you, if they were unreliable, would they have passed the test of time? No, Ford is not stupid and keep an unreliable engine design on the market sacrificing sales. I think it is important that we don’t let the low number of 2.0 EcoBoost issues reported cloud your judgment and instead look at the bigger picture. The sheer number of these produced every year put into all kinds of services prove the quality of the engine design and performance.

Hope this helps. :cool:
 
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Phileaux

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Preferring a 2.0L turbo 4 to a 3.5L N/A V6 from one of the best engine companies on the planet is super weird, but to each their own. I don't see the Maverick and Ridgeline as competitors. But literally everyone else on the planet laments the loss of naturally aspirated V6 engines except MTC people worried about a 105k timing belt service but not at all about the potential complications from a small turbo engine.

I'm buying a Maverick, and I have never considered a Ridgeline. But the J-series Honda V6 is a tried/true wonderful engine with a unique sound and smoothness.
I have owned Honda's past 25yrs but Mitsubishi engines are the best built and trouble free.

Having worked service at a Ford/Honda dealership I'd say the biggest difference is the people. Honda owners (generally) WILL bring in vehicle for the 30k, 60k, 90k, etc maintenance. Ford "Tough" owners run'em until there is an issue.
 


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I

My intention is not to cause concern for anyone that may want to buy a Maverick with the 2.0 EB. That's not the context of the post. You may want to do your own research. A quick internet search engine reveals far more than what is really important.

My research revealed that Ford's 2.0 EcoBoost direct injection engine does not have huge problems, but still, some car owners have reported some issues over the years of production. The one that concerned me was the integrated exhaust manifold design. The manifold is made of stainless steel and integrated directly into the cylinder head. Because of hi-temps and the heating/cooling cycle, the stainless steel exhaust manifold can develop hairline cracks. There operative word is can, not that it will. The issue is rare.

Remember, this same engine is used in the Edge, Escape/Ford Kuga, Explorer, Focus ST, Fusion, Taurus, Lincoln Corsair, Lincoln MKZ, and Lincoln Nautilus. The sheer numbers produced by Ford bogles my mind. Therefore, I must point out this engine has been operating for about 12 years now. Over the years, Ford modified it to make it better, and an excellent example is the 2nd generation engine that is in our Mavericks.

Let me ask you, if they were unreliable, would they have passed the test of time? No, Ford is not stupid and keep an unreliable engine design on the market sacrificing sales. I think it is important that we don’t let the low number of 2.0 EcoBoost issues reported cloud your judgment and instead look at the bigger picture. The sheer number of these produced every year put into all kinds of services prove the quality of the engine design and performance.

Hope this helps. :cool:
Thank you for the extensive right up. My wife has leased (4) Ford's with the 2.0EB (2) Fusions and (2) Edge's. She only leases for 24 months so we've never had an issue with the 2.0EB but they are always under warranty during the duration of the lease. She is thinking of buying a Maverick this time and would most likely go with the EB for the AWD, etc.

I was just curious what your research on the EB had turned up. Thanks again for the reply.
 

uh50

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Thank you for the extensive right up. My wife has leased (4) Ford's with the 2.0EB (2) Fusions and (2) Edge's. She only leases for 24 months so we've never had an issue with the 2.0EB but they are always under warranty during the duration of the lease. She is thinking of buying a Maverick this time and would most likely go with the EB for the AWD, etc.

I was just curious what your research on the EB had turned up. Thanks again for the reply.
No problem. As an engineer, I love research and also writing. Maybe one of these days I'll actually get good at it. Thanks for the encouragement.
 

Mavonorder

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Thank you for the extensive right up. My wife has leased (4) Ford's with the 2.0EB (2) Fusions and (2) Edge's. She only leases for 24 months so we've never had an issue with the 2.0EB but they are always under warranty during the duration of the lease. She is thinking of buying a Maverick this time and would most likely go with the EB for the AWD, etc.

I was just curious what your research on the EB had turned up. Thanks again for the reply.
I

My intention is not to cause concern for anyone that may want to buy a Maverick with the 2.0 EB. That's not the context of the post. You may want to do your own research. A quick internet search engine reveals far more than what is really important.

My research revealed that Ford's 2.0 EcoBoost direct injection engine does not have huge problems, but still, some car owners have reported some issues over the years of production. The one that concerned me was the integrated exhaust manifold design. The manifold is made of stainless steel and integrated directly into the cylinder head. Because of hi-temps and the heating/cooling cycle, the stainless steel exhaust manifold can develop hairline cracks. There operative word is can, not that it will. The issue is rare.

Remember, this same engine is used in the Edge, Escape/Ford Kuga, Explorer, Focus ST, Fusion, Taurus, Lincoln Corsair, Lincoln MKZ, and Lincoln Nautilus. The sheer numbers produced by Ford bogles my mind. Therefore, I must point out this engine has been operating for about 12 years now. Over the years, Ford modified it to make it better, and an excellent example is the 2nd generation engine that is in our Mavericks.

Let me ask you, if they were unreliable, would they have passed the test of time? No, Ford is not stupid and keep an unreliable engine design on the market sacrificing sales. I think it is important that we don’t let the low number of 2.0 EcoBoost issues reported cloud your judgment and instead look at the bigger picture. The sheer number of these produced every year put into all kinds of services prove the quality of the engine design and performance.

Hope this helps. :cool:
There operative word is can, not that it will. The issue is rare.

I am concerned about the integrated head/exhaust manifold and potential for cracks over time. Especially since I think I saw somewhere that cracks in the exhaust manifold were not covered under the Ford warranty. Based on your research, do you think the cases of cracks was due to abuse of the eb 2.0 by people hammering all the time on the engine? Thanks for any insight! 👍
 

uh50

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There operative word is can, not that it will. The issue is rare.

I am concerned about the integrated head/exhaust manifold and potential for cracks over time. Especially since I think I saw somewhere that cracks in the exhaust manifold were not covered under the Ford warranty. Based on your research, do you think the cases of cracks was due to abuse of the eb 2.0 by people hammering all the time on the engine? Thanks for any insight! 👍
Misuse is certainly part of the problem, since any "hammering" causes higher temperatures. I wish I had researched the actual number of reports and the results of the report investigation, but I did not. However, several of the articles stated the issue was rare. Obviously, it did not overly concern me since I bought the 2.0 EB. But then I do meticulously maintain a vehicle.
 

TyPope

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any members here that can copy and paste the rest? Did it account the hybrid recall?
If you like the report, please consider subscribing to Consumer Reports. It's a non-profit organization that does NOT have advertising and thus is not swayed by income stream. They are pretty biased against Tesla though...

Here's the article.



The Maverick is a new small pickup based on Ford’s Bronco Sport and Escape SUVs. Starting at just under $20,000, it occupies an increasingly popular niche—a small truck that can be bought on a budget. With a civilized ride, handy maneuverability, easy access, and decent fuel efficiency, the Maverick outscores every pickup in its class, other than the larger and more expensive Honda Ridgeline.
It is better-suited to most “truck stuff”—whether for work or play—than the similarly-sized Hyundai Santa Cruz. For instance, the Ford’s 4.5-foot-long bed has about one-and-a-half times the volume of the little Hyundai’s, and the bed’s low height makes it easy to load. The tailgate can be positioned at an upward angle which, in conjunction with the tops of the rear wheel wells and ratchet straps, makes it possible to carry standard 4x8 sheets of plywood. Owners are also likely to appreciate the handy sliding tie-down rings and in-bed lighting. One “truck stuff” area where the Santa Cruz is superior is towing: When properly equipped the Hyundai has the ability to tow a trailer of up to 5,000 pounds, whereas the Ford is limited to 4,000 pounds.
The Maverick’s standard powertrain is a hybrid, employing the same hardware as the Escape hybrid. The 191-horsepower, 2.5-liter four-cylinder with electric drive is linked to a continuously variable transmission (CVT) and front-wheel drive. The hybrid version that we tested can do most small truck workhorse tasks, but the powertrain registered 37 mpg overall in our tests, making it far more efficient than any other pickup. It’s not as quick as the turbo model, but the electric motor gives smooth and robust response at low speeds, and we like that the hybrid eliminates the turbo model’s annoying engine vibrations.
We also tested an XLT with the 250-hp, 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder that comes mated to an eight-speed automatic transmission. The engine is well-matched to the Maverick’s weight, with just-robust-enough power for most driving situations, though it can sound wheezy and uninspiring. Its 0 to 60 mph time of 7.1 seconds is competitive with other small-to-midsized trucks; it isn’t quite as quick as the speedy Santa Cruz, but it’s a hair quicker than the Ridgeline. Our tested all-wheel-drive model managed 23 mpg overall on regular fuel.
The ride is firm, but it’s less unruly when driving on bumpy roads than most pickups. With different tires and weight distribution, the hybrid model felt more steady and composed and without the quick, short pitches that we found on the turbo AWD version. And although the Maverick doesn’t turn into corners with quite the verve of the Santa Cruz, it proved utterly secure and confidence-inspiring around our test track. The compact dimensions make it adept in parking maneuvers and outward visibility is quite good. It also turned in short, consistent stopping distances.
Refinement was clearly not a high priority for the Maverick. It can get pretty loud inside the cabin, due to a combination of engine and wind noise, especially on the highway. The engine’s tendency to lug along at low revs can send uncouth vibrations into the cabin, which gets annoying. The hybrid model is noticeably quieter. The utilitarian interior is full of cheap-feeling plastic pieces, which isn’t surprising given its price. The controls, including the infotainment screen and the climate system’s large knobs and physical buttons, are a breeze to use.
Unlike most pickups, it’s easy to get in and out of the Maverick due to its low floor height. The front seatbacks are well-bolstered, but thigh support is lacking. Available only as a crew cab, the rear seat has plenty of headroom, but legroom is tight for taller passengers, and the upright seatback can get uncomfortable on long trips.
Forward collision warning and automatic emergency braking with pedestrian detection come standard, but important active safety features such as blind spot warning and rear cross traffic warning are optional across all trims, instead of standard. Lane departure warning and lane keeping assistance are also optional. Adaptive cruise control and lane centering assistance are only optionally available on the top Lariat trim.
Best Version to Get
The hybrid is the best way to maximize fuel economy, but its usefulness is limited in snowy regions since it’s only available with front-wheel drive. The optional turbo engine is the way to go for buyers looking for more power and all-wheel-drive traction. Regardless, we’d opt for the XLT trim equipped with the Luxury package, as it includes a power driver’s seat and a bedliner. The Ford Co-Pilot360 is a worthwhile option as it brings blind spot warning and rear cross traffic warning.
Notable changes:
The Maverick is an all-new model for 2022, based on Ford’s Bronco Sport and Escape small SUVs.
Performance
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The hybrid version gets excellent fuel economy, eliminates the idle vibration of the 2.0T, and can scoot on electric power at low speed. But it only comes as a FWD.
Drivetrain
The optional 250-horsepower, 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder is well-matched to the size and weight of the Maverick. It gets off the line without hesitation, and provides decent mid-range thrust. We found that there’s just-robust-enough power for most driving situations, though it doesn’t have the power reserves of the Santa Cruz with its optional turbo engine. The Maverick’s engine can also sound wheezy and uninspiring.
The eight-speed automatic upshifts smoothly, and downshifts come in a timely and mostly smooth fashion. But there are certain situations, especially on secondary roads when driving at around 30-40 mph, that the transmission shifts into too tall of a gear, causing the engine to lug in an unrefined fashion which sends vibrations into the cabin. A minor press on the gas pedal usually brings a quick downshift, but it can still be a bit annoying.
Its 0 to 60 mph time of 7.1 seconds is competitive with other small-to-midsized trucks; it isn’t quite as quick as the speedy Santa Cruz, but it’s a hair quicker than the larger Ford Ranger, Honda Ridgeline, and Nissan Frontier. While the hybrid's power delivery benefits from an initial electric boost that feels very gratifying in a low speed, it's ultimately slower, hitting 0 to 60 mph in 8.3 seconds.
They hybrid model comes with a CVT, so there's no traditional steps between gears. Hence, it feels smooth and unobtrusive in low throttle applications. The hybrid also eliminates the lugging and associated resonance that the turbo version suffers from at low revs. With high power demands, such as having to merge or climb a hill, the transmission will elicit a pronounced engine moan, however.
Our tested all-wheel-drive model managed 23 mpg overall on regular fuel. That’s notably more frugal than traditional pickup trucks, and just 1-mpg shy of the slightly smaller Santa Cruz with its optional turbo engine. The Maverick’s stop/start system, which is designed to save fuel by shutting off the engine at stoplights, is nearly seamless, firing the engine back up super-quickly as soon as you take your foot off the brake pedal to get moving again.
But the Maverick fuel economy king is the hybrid model, which registered 37 mpg overall in our tests, making it far more efficient than any other pickup.
Handling
Both versions of the Maverick are competent little vehicles to drive around. This truck doesn’t turn into corners with quite the eagerness of the Santa Cruz, but there’s a responsiveness and tautness to it that our drivers appreciated.
Agility is a bit diminished compared to the Bronco Sport and Escape small SUVs it’s derived from, but it’s still head and shoulders above any traditional body-on-frame pickup when it comes to taking corners with verve. The Maverick’s steering has a natural heft to it (without feeling excessively heavy, such as in the Frontier) and it gives the driver a small amount of feedback about front-tire grip and road texture, which we appreciate. Good resistance to body lean through turns, a well-tuned electronic stability control (ESC) system, and the keen ability of the all-wheel-drive system to put the power down to all four tires exiting turns helped make the Maverick secure and confidence-inspiring around our track.
Our testers said it was easy to drive the truck through CR’s avoidance maneuver—a test which simulates swerving quickly, with a left-right-left steering sequence. And the Maverick’s speeds of 52.5 mph and 51.5 mph, for the turbo and hybrid versions respectively, are quite good for a pickup truck.
The little Ford instilled confidence when pushed hard around our twisty road-course track, with the front tires always losing traction well before the rear tires, which is a steady and safe attitude. The chassis was somewhat responsive to changes in throttle to curb the front-tire push, with small amounts of easy-to-control oversteer (which is when the rear tires lose grip, and step out slightly) induced, but the truck is far from sporty or fun to drive at its limits.
Ride comfort
The Maverick’s ride benefits from its car-based unibody construction, as opposed to the more rugged body-on-frame setup of traditional pickups. The ride is firm, but it gets less unruly over big bumps than most pickups. Some impacts, particularly at lower speeds, come through into the cabin, and there is some bounciness or abruptness to the ride at times. Still, within the world of pickups, the Maverick delivers one of the most civilized rides. We noticed occasional suspension noise when encountering harder-edged bumps, such as potholes, which make the Maverick feel a bit unrefined.
With different tires and weight distribution, the hybrid model felt more steady and composed and without the quick, short pitches that we found on the turbo AWD version.
Noise
Although road and tire noise are kept at acceptable levels inside the Maverick, elevated wind noise along with an engine that one tester described as “sounding like a turbocharged blender under the hood” make for a fairly loud experience on the highway. In fairness, the engine rarely gets boisterous, even during hard acceleration, it just has an industrial-like wheezy character that’s uninspiring. It also doesn’t help that the Maverick’s transmission logic often results in early upshifts, which causes the engine to “lug” at low revs, resulting in a vibration felt through the cabin. Wind noise on the highway creeps in mostly around the windshield pillars and from the side mirrors, and ambient air noise from the rear-seat area means occupants have to raise their voices to be heard.
The hybrid is a bit quieter than the regular Maverick XLT, thanks to its ability to drive under electric power at low speeds and because our tested Lariat trim’s acoustic-glass windshield cuts down on highway wind noise.
Braking
The Maverick turned in an excellent braking performance, managing short stops on both dry and wet surfaces. Stopping distances were consistent and the truck was very stable during these panic-brake tests. Out on the road, our drivers found the brake pedal for the non-hybrid easy to modulate, allowing you to stop exactly where you intended with minimal effort.
We were annoyed by the grabbiness of the hybrid’s brakes at low speeds, which can make it difficult to stop exactly where you want without adjusting your pressure on the pedal.
Driver assistance
Our Maverick was not equipped with an active driving assistance system, which is the combination of adaptive cruise control (ACC) and lane centering assistance (LCA). ACC is only optionally available on the top Lariat trim line.
Lane departure warning (LDW) and lane keeping assistance (LKA) come as part of the optional Ford Co-Pilot360 package. The LDW system warns the driver that the Maverick is crossing over a lane line by giving a visual alert and vibrating the steering wheel. The LKA system comes with two stages of warnings -- an orange warning within the instrument cluster with a light nudge of the steering wheel when close to the lane line, followed by a red warning within the instrument cluster and a stronger nudge of the steering wheel when on top of the lane line.
Headlights
We rated the Maverick’s LED headlights, which come standard on all trims, as only doing a “fair” job overall, the score limited mainly by the lack of low-beam illumination. As with most LED systems, the headlights provide a high level of intensity with a very white and bright light.
The low beams provide only “fair” levels of light straight ahead down the road. They don’t give enough light for the driver to adequately see, react, and brake for anything ahead when speeds reach about 60 mph. Sideward visibility was rated at “good,” which is lower than the levels of sideward visibility we typically see with better-performing LED headlights. Sideward visibility can help drivers see pedestrians and wildlife entering from the sides of the road, or in navigating corners.
In contrast, the high beams do a “very good” job of lighting the road ahead, although the distance is shorter than what most high beams achieve. Automatic high beams (which Ford refers to as “Auto Hi-Beam”) come standard across all Maverick trims. This system can help drivers take advantage of the additional visibility that high beams bring more frequently, as it automatically switches the high beams on anytime traffic and conditions allow—an especially important feature given the Maverick’s lack of low-beam visibility. We found that the system appropriately changed back and forth between low and high beams, but the automatic high beams have to be turned on by going through a setting within the instrument cluster, forcing extra searching for what should be a simple task, such as the press of a button on the dashboard.
The top Lariat trims also include wiper-activated headlights, a smart feature that assures the Maverick’s headlights are on in rainy weather, even if it's not nighttime.
Towing
The Maverick with the optional turbo four-cylinder and all-wheel drive can tow up to 4,000 pounds, when equipped with the 4K Tow package which adds a transmission oil cooler, a higher-capacity radiator, an upgraded cooling fan, shorter gearing, and a trailer brake controller. For comparison, the Hyundai Santa Cruz has the ability to tow a trailer of up to 5,000 pounds.
Since our tested Maverick wasn’t equipped with the towing package, our truck is only rated to tow 2,000 pounds, despite having the optional turbocharged engine and all-wheel drive. The hybrid version, which comes only with front-wheel drive, has a maximum tow rating of 2,000 pounds.
Off-road
Unlike most midsized pickups—and all full-sized trucks—that use a more sturdy body-on-frame construction and have robust four-wheel-drive systems, the Maverick isn’t intended for serious off-road duty. As such, we didn’t attempt to take our all-wheel-drive XLT up the Auto Test Center’s challenging Rock Hill. The Maverick has only modest ground clearance and long overhangs that would likely result in damaged body panels or other mechanical components. An FX4 off-road package is available that adds skid plates, all-terrain tires, and additional off-road-oriented drive modes, but the Maverick’s “off-road experience” is better suited to gravel roads, mild dirt trails, and other slippery surfaces.
Comfort & Convenience
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Controls are as easy to operate as they come.
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Unfortunately the tailgate is not damped like in many other trucks and slams open.
14064-2022-ford-maverick-24572.jpg

The controls, including the infotainment screen and the climate system’s large knobs and physical buttons, are a breeze to use.
14064-2022-ford-maverick-25299.jpg

Like many trucks, the Maverick has large storage bins underneath the rear seats.
14064-2022-ford-maverick-24573.jpg

All Mavericks come with USB Type-A and Type-C ports up front. Lariat trims get additional rear-seat USB ports.
14064-2022-ford-maverick-25302.jpg

Buyers have to choose the Lariat trim to get adaptive cruise control.
14064-2022-ford-maverick-25317.jpg

Thanks to a laminated acoustic windshield, the Lariat is quieter than the XLT.
14064-2022-ford-maverick-25304.jpg

The bed is small but deep. It is fitted with thoughtful details like lighting, bottle openers, and a 120V power outlet.
14064-2022-ford-maverick-25297.jpg

Some staffers complained that their pocket book would catch on the door latch.
14064-2022-ford-maverick-25301.jpg

Lariat models get a power sliding rear window that helps ventilation.
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The door pockets are extremely shallow, and we’d worry about them falling out when you open the door.


Interior fit and finish
The Maverick’s utilitarian interior is full of cheap, hollow-sounding plastic pieces, which isn’t surprising given its fairly low starting price. In truth, most pickups—even full-sized models—have lots of plastic panels compared with cars, and Ford did a good job of at least making the Maverick look unique, with items such as exposed screws on the door pulls and an interesting mix of colors and materials. We also appreciated the leather-wrapped steering wheel which comes as part of the XLT Luxury package; a urethane steering wheel comes standard on the base XL and XLT.
Most of the controls have a solid feel to them, but the climate control’s fan-speed and temperature knobs have mushy, undefined detents, which makes it too easy to turn the knob further than intended. We did find a fair amount of rough edges on the plastic panels here and there, and the instrument cluster shroud is pretty flimsy and poorly attached. The cloth seats in our XLT test model have a rather scratchy feel to them.
Our Lariat model came with faux leather seats, which felt a lot nicer than the scratchy fabric. However, most testers were underwhelmed with this Lariat trim—we expected more since this is the top-of-the-line model; there simply isn’t much here that justifies the price premium over the XLT.
Driving position
The Maverick’s driving position is similar to the Bronco Sport upon which it is based, which means it has an upright feel with a slightly elevated and commanding view of the road ahead. Headroom and space around the driver is plentiful, but the inability to independently tilt the leading edge of the bottom cushion made for a compromised position for some drivers. The center console is very low (more so than the Bronco Sport), which avoids right-knee intrusion issues for most drivers. The door- and center armrests are well-placed, but there isn’t enough padding on the door to give good elbow comfort for long drives. The steering column has adequate tilt and telescope range. While the left footrest is tall enough for large feet, it’s on the narrow side.
Visibility
The Maverick’s boxy pickup shape yields good outward visibility for the most part. The windshield is large and the view over the hood is aided by the flat, low dashboard. The windshield pillars get thick toward the base and, together with the side mirrors, form a good-sized blind spot that the driver has to peer around to see pedestrians and other vehicles when navigating intersections. The side windows are nice and tall, but the thick side pillars hamper over-the-shoulder views when changing lanes. The rear window in our tested XLT is a clean pane of glass, free of the sliding rear window bars that obstruct the views out the back of most pickups. The rear-seat headrests block the outer edges of the window, and they can’t be folded down when the seat isn’t in use.
Our hybrid Lariat model has a power sliding rear window, which results in a minor reduction in rear glass area compared to the XLT. The lack of a rear window defroster could be problematic in cold, icy conditions.
Seat comfort and access
The XLT’s front seats are fairly basic and proved only marginally comfortable for most drivers. While the seatback is well-bolstered, and we appreciate that the eight-way power-adjustable driver’s seat in our XLT with the Luxury package has two-way lumbar, the bottom cushion is short, a bit narrow, and flat. As such, there’s only minimal thigh support, which compromises comfort on longer drives. The front passenger seat has six-way manual adjustments. The top Lariat trim offers the same level of cushion adjustments, only adding four-way head restraints.
Available only as a crew cab, the Maverick’s rear seat is good-sized considering how small the vehicle is, making it usable for kids, or adults on shorter trips. There’s plenty of headroom and foot space underneath the front seats, and the angled-back bottom cushion gives good thigh support. But legroom is tight for taller passengers, and the upright seatback—the angle of which can’t be adjusted—can get uncomfortable on long trips. We do appreciate that padded door armrests made their way into the second row. Unlike most pickups, it’s easy to get in and out of the Maverick due to its low floor height. The front seats are positioned at around hip height for most adults and combined with tall doors with wide openings this makes it easy to slide right into the seat. Shorter-legged occupants might brush a pants leg on the rocker panel getting back out. It’s pretty easy to get in and out of the rear seat, too, with the biggest obstacle being the tight knee space due to the close proximity of the front seats. The door openings are also a bit narrower but the seat cushion is, again, an easy height to slide over and onto.
Usability
Most of the Maverick’s controls are basic but functional and easy to use. This includes the infotainment touch screen as well as the climate system’s large knobs and physical buttons. The media controls are split between the left and right sides of the steering wheel, causing some searching for functions while driving. The instrument cluster is basic, but also easy to use.
The climate system’s “mode man” allows for individual adjustment of the air flow, making it easy to distinguish between the head, feet, etc. without needing a menu screen. Having three fan speeds to choose from for “Auto” mode was appreciated by testers.
We did have a few relatively minor quibbles. For instance, the headlight dial is blocked by the left side of the steering wheel, and the automatic high beams have to be turned on by going through a setting within the instrument cluster, forcing extra searching for what should be a simple task, such as pressing a button on the dashboard. The button to activate the hazard lights—located in the middle of the media controls on the center stack—is too small, making it difficult to find quickly. Also, the inner door pull’s open-hook setup requires that front occupants grab a very specific location to close the door, and it can catch purse handles and keychains when entering the vehicle.
Infotainment
The Maverick uses a simplified version of Ford’s familiar and easy-to-use Sync 3 infotainment system. The full version of Sync 3 is optional on the top Lariat trim, and that is the only way to get SiriusXM satellite radio. The system is logically organized and simple to navigate, aided by large fonts and buttons. Most vehicle settings are accessed within the touch screen but there’s minimal available customization of the system itself; for example, you can’t rearrange the menu icons as you can with some systems. The screen isn’t tilted toward the driver, which gives both the driver and passenger equal access. But, it’s positioned in a completely vertical fashion, which can be awkward for those who prefer to have a perch for their wrist while interacting with the screen. The system can be slow to respond at times, but most functions have redundant physical controls and the climate system is completely separate, which limits frustration. There doesn’t appear to be an anti-glare coating on the screen, and as such we found that it can get washed out and become very difficult to read in bright, direct sunlight.
Phone
Pairing Bluetooth devices is simple and wired Android Auto and Apple CarPlay compatibility come standard on all trims. Initiating phone calls can be done through the instrument cluster by using the steering-wheel controls (rather than having to go through the infotainment screen), which means you can keep your hands on the wheel. But it does require a few steps to navigate to the phone menu, instead of simply pressing a dedicated phone button. Wireless Android Auto and Apple CarPlay are not available. A wireless charger is only optional on the top Lariat trim. Also, the Lariat trim includes phone controls within the instrument cluster for easier dialing without taking your hands off the wheel.
Connectivity
Every Maverick is compatible with the free FordPass app that allows you to lock/unlock, locate, and start your vehicle. We like that these remote functions do not cost extra as they do with many other vehicles. The FordPass app ran well on our iPhone, and connected reliably to the vehicle. The remote-start and door-lock controls are presented on the first page of the app when you open it, but there are a lot of other features and menus that can take time to sort through and learn. All Mavericks come with USB Type-A and Type-C ports up front. Lariat trims get additional rear-seat USB ports.
Climate features
The XLT comes with a single-zone automatic climate system. Our test truck was equipped with the optional XLT Luxury package, which includes heat for the front seats, steering wheel, and side mirrors. We appreciate that the climate controls are physical buttons and knobs, rather than of the touch-screen variety—this makes for a more precise and consistent action. The remote-start system pre-conditions the cabin, triggering the heated seats and steering wheel—both of which get very warm very quickly. Our top-shelf Lariat comes standard with a dual-zone automatic climate system. We added the extra-cost Lariat Luxury package, which includes heated exterior mirrors, heated front seats, heated steering wheel, and a heated section of the windshield where the wipers park.
Cabin storage
Front passengers get several open bins in the center console, as well as a deep covered storage bin under the padded armrest between the seats. Most of the bins have a grippy rubber padding, which helps keep items from sliding around. The door pockets are extremely shallow, which is surprising for a utilitarian vehicle such as a pickup—you’d be hard-pressed to stash much more than a pair of thick winter gloves in there, and we’d worry about them falling out when you open the door. The XLT comes with a single storage pocket behind the front passenger seat; the Lariat has pockets behind both seats. Like many trucks, the Maverick has large storage bins underneath the rear seats.
Cup holders
Front passengers get two cup holders located next to the gear selector dial on the center console, each with grippy rubber bases and plastic anti-tip measures to help hold drinks in place. Rear-seat occupants have two cup holders nestled into the fold-down center armrest. All four doors include built-in bottle holders.
Cargo area
Considering that the Maverick’s bed is only 4.5-feet long—a foot shorter than the smallest bed available on the full-sized F-150—the total volume, at 26 cubic-feet, is good-sized and fairly useful. For comparison, that’s about one-and-a-half times the cubic-volume of the Hyundai Santa Cruz’s 4-foot-long bed.
The Maverick’s low bed height makes it easy to load, especially compared to full-sized pickups and most traditional midsized trucks. For example, the side rails are low enough that you can access the bed by reaching over them. There are handy sliding tie-down rings that let you adjust your anchor points, and an attempt was made to extract more usefulness from the bed’s dimensions with molded-in pockets designed to fit typical 2x4 and 2x6 boards, enabling the bed to be partitioned in various configurations to suit your storage needs. There’s also a bed light and a 120-volt outlet.
The tailgate can be positioned at an upward angle which, in conjunction with the tops of the rear wheel wells and ratchet straps, makes it possible to carry standard 4x8 sheets of plywood. But alas, the tailgate doesn’t have a damped opening, unlike most trucks these days, but at least it’s very light and easy to lift up.
Spare tire
A temporary spare tire is standard. A full-size spare is optional on all trims.
Driver Assist Systems & Crash Protection
Crash-test results
Neither the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) nor the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) have crash-tested the Maverick yet.
Crash-avoidance systems
Standard active safety features on the Maverick include forward collision warning and automatic emergency braking with pedestrian detection. Blind spot warning and rear cross traffic warning are optional as part of the Ford Co-Pilot360 package.
Forward collision warning (FCW) and automatic emergency braking (AEB) with pedestrian detection -- These systems monitor for vehicles and pedestrians ahead, and are designed to reduce the likelihood and/or severity of frontal crashes. FCW and AEB—which Ford refers to as “Pre-Collision Assist”—recognize vehicles ahead when the Maverick is traveling between 3 to 75 mph. The FCW will alert the driver with audible and visual warnings if the system senses a potential collision. The AEB will be initiated if the driver fails to react to the system’s warnings in time to help mitigate the anticipated crash. The pedestrian detection system is active between 3 to 50 mph.
Blind spot warning (BSW) -- If another vehicle is traveling in a lane beside the Maverick, potentially hidden in a blind spot, the BSW system lights up a small yellow icon in the corresponding side mirror to warn of a vehicle in an adjacent lane. The icon will flash quickly if the driver starts to move over into an already-occupied lane.
Rear cross traffic warning (RCTW) -- When in Reverse, this system scans for vehicles approaching from behind the Maverick and will give audible and visual warnings to help get the driver’s attention. The BSW icons will light up in the side mirrors, and an arrow will appear in the backup camera screen pointing to the direction the vehicle is approaching from. This is a very handy feature when backing out of a tight parking space, or when reversing from a blind driveway out onto a busy road.
Crash notification
There isn’t a built-in modem to enable SOS functionality, like there is in many other vehicles. Automatic Collision Notification (911 Assist, as Ford calls it) requires an active Bluetooth phone connection, which is generally less reliable than an integrated system. However, unlike many competitors, Ford doesn’t charge extra for this feature. We like that a pop-up on the center infotainment screen asks if you would like to enable it when you pair your device, something we recommend all Maverick owners do.
Rollaway risk
The Maverick’s electronic rotary gear selector dial meets CR’s rollaway-risk requirements. If the driver fails to select Park and the vehicle is left in Reverse or Drive when the ignition is turned off, or the driver’s door is opened, the transmission will automatically shift into Park.
Child safety
Overall, car seats were mostly easy to secure with the vehicle belt, with the exception of some infant seats. Lower anchors are available in the outboard seats and center-seat lower-anchor borrowing is allowed if the car-seat manufacturer allows for non-standard lower anchor spacing. Tether attachment is a bit cumbersome but not impossible. Three car seats will fit across this rear seat.
Lower anchors are available and exposed at the seat crease in the outboard seats. They are close to the seat cushion and a little deep, so you may need to twist to remove the connectors. Center LATCH installations are allowed by Ford by borrowing the inboard lower anchors if the car seat manufacturer also allows for LATCH installation with non-standard spacing.
Tether anchors are exposed behind the seat on the back wall of the truck, which makes it difficult to fully tighten the tether. The tether should be routed under the outboard head restraint. The Maverick owner’s manual says the tether should be routed over the head restraint in the center seat, but a spokesperson from Ford told CR that the tether can be routed under a raised center head restraint.
It’s hard to balance a child seat on the vehicle seat while trying to attach to the tether anchor behind the seatback, with the seatback folded forward. Also, the tether has to be twisted to get the hook into the proper orientation illustrated by the Maverick owner’s manual, but it’s important to note that for proper child-passenger safety, the tether strap should not be twisted. It’s also difficult to get the rear seat latched against the back wall after tether attachment.
Some infant seat designs could not be installed securely with the vehicle belt in the rear seat because of the tall, floppy buckles and wide belt-anchor spacing. Others can be securely installed with some extra effort.
Rear-facing convertibles were easy to install with the vehicle belt in all rear seating positions.
Forward-facing car seats were easy to secure with the vehicle belt in the rear seats.
Booster use
The rear head restraints will need to be removed to accommodate a highback booster. Boosters fit on the second-row outboard seat and sit stably. The outboard buckle recesses a little as you try to buckle it, which may make it a bit more challenging for a kid to do on their own.
In the rear center seat, a booster may have to be shifted a little towards the left outboard seat to access the center buckle, but not enough to prevent a left outboard occupant. Two hands are needed to buckle in the rear center seat.
Rear occupant alert
The Maverick lacks Ford’s end-of-trip alert system that reminds drivers to check the rear seat for occupants—it comes standard on other models, such as the Bronco Sport. That’s an oversight, because this rear-door-logic system could help prevent kids and pets from dying when left in hot cars.
Rear head restraints
The rear center head restraint needs to be raised for safe usage. The outboard head restraints are tall enough for adults and kids to use safely.
Rear belt minder
Ford’s rear belt minder system alerts the driver when a rear passenger unbuckles by giving audible alerts and visual warnings within the instrument cluster. But, the rear center seat is not included in the rear belt minder in the Maverick, which is a glaring omission. Additionally, the Maverick system differs from other Ford rear belt minders because it doesn’t allow the driver to dismiss the belt minder, which would be helpful if a rear passenger exited the vehicle, or accidently used the wrong buckle.
Advanced rear restraints
The rear outboard seats have seat-belt pretensioners and load-limiters providing additional protection for belted rear occupants.
Warranty
All cars come with basic warranty coverage, also known as a bumper-to-bumper warranty. This protects consumers against unexpected problems with non-wear items. Powertrain warranty protects against engine and transmission troubles. Rust through, or corrosion warranty, covers rust to non-damaged components. Roadside aid provides on-location assistance in case of a breakdown and may include limited towing services.
Extended warranties provide peace of mind. Owners of models known to have worse-than-average predicted reliability can mitigate risks with an extended warranty. Generally, we recommend buying a model with better-than-average reliability and skipping this expensive add on. If you do buy an extended warranty, it is key to read the small print to understand what is covered and where you can bring the car for repairs.
Basic
3 years/36,000 miles
Drivetrain
5 years/60,000 miles
Corrosion
5 years/unlimited miles
Hybrid
8 years/100,000 miles
Roadside Aid
 
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davnau

davnau

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If you like the report, please consider subscribing to Consumer Reports. It's a non-profit organization that does NOT have advertising and thus is not swayed by income stream. They are pretty biased against Tesla though...

Here's the article.



The Maverick is a new small pickup based on Ford’s Bronco Sport and Escape SUVs. Starting at just under $20,000, it occupies an increasingly popular niche—a small truck that can be bought on a budget. With a civilized ride, handy maneuverability, easy access, and decent fuel efficiency, the Maverick outscores every pickup in its class, other than the larger and more expensive Honda Ridgeline.
It is better-suited to most “truck stuff”—whether for work or play—than the similarly-sized Hyundai Santa Cruz. For instance, the Ford’s 4.5-foot-long bed has about one-and-a-half times the volume of the little Hyundai’s, and the bed’s low height makes it easy to load. The tailgate can be positioned at an upward angle which, in conjunction with the tops of the rear wheel wells and ratchet straps, makes it possible to carry standard 4x8 sheets of plywood. Owners are also likely to appreciate the handy sliding tie-down rings and in-bed lighting. One “truck stuff” area where the Santa Cruz is superior is towing: When properly equipped the Hyundai has the ability to tow a trailer of up to 5,000 pounds, whereas the Ford is limited to 4,000 pounds.
The Maverick’s standard powertrain is a hybrid, employing the same hardware as the Escape hybrid. The 191-horsepower, 2.5-liter four-cylinder with electric drive is linked to a continuously variable transmission (CVT) and front-wheel drive. The hybrid version that we tested can do most small truck workhorse tasks, but the powertrain registered 37 mpg overall in our tests, making it far more efficient than any other pickup. It’s not as quick as the turbo model, but the electric motor gives smooth and robust response at low speeds, and we like that the hybrid eliminates the turbo model’s annoying engine vibrations.
We also tested an XLT with the 250-hp, 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder that comes mated to an eight-speed automatic transmission. The engine is well-matched to the Maverick’s weight, with just-robust-enough power for most driving situations, though it can sound wheezy and uninspiring. Its 0 to 60 mph time of 7.1 seconds is competitive with other small-to-midsized trucks; it isn’t quite as quick as the speedy Santa Cruz, but it’s a hair quicker than the Ridgeline. Our tested all-wheel-drive model managed 23 mpg overall on regular fuel.
The ride is firm, but it’s less unruly when driving on bumpy roads than most pickups. With different tires and weight distribution, the hybrid model felt more steady and composed and without the quick, short pitches that we found on the turbo AWD version. And although the Maverick doesn’t turn into corners with quite the verve of the Santa Cruz, it proved utterly secure and confidence-inspiring around our test track. The compact dimensions make it adept in parking maneuvers and outward visibility is quite good. It also turned in short, consistent stopping distances.
Refinement was clearly not a high priority for the Maverick. It can get pretty loud inside the cabin, due to a combination of engine and wind noise, especially on the highway. The engine’s tendency to lug along at low revs can send uncouth vibrations into the cabin, which gets annoying. The hybrid model is noticeably quieter. The utilitarian interior is full of cheap-feeling plastic pieces, which isn’t surprising given its price. The controls, including the infotainment screen and the climate system’s large knobs and physical buttons, are a breeze to use.
Unlike most pickups, it’s easy to get in and out of the Maverick due to its low floor height. The front seatbacks are well-bolstered, but thigh support is lacking. Available only as a crew cab, the rear seat has plenty of headroom, but legroom is tight for taller passengers, and the upright seatback can get uncomfortable on long trips.
Forward collision warning and automatic emergency braking with pedestrian detection come standard, but important active safety features such as blind spot warning and rear cross traffic warning are optional across all trims, instead of standard. Lane departure warning and lane keeping assistance are also optional. Adaptive cruise control and lane centering assistance are only optionally available on the top Lariat trim.
Best Version to Get
The hybrid is the best way to maximize fuel economy, but its usefulness is limited in snowy regions since it’s only available with front-wheel drive. The optional turbo engine is the way to go for buyers looking for more power and all-wheel-drive traction. Regardless, we’d opt for the XLT trim equipped with the Luxury package, as it includes a power driver’s seat and a bedliner. The Ford Co-Pilot360 is a worthwhile option as it brings blind spot warning and rear cross traffic warning.
Notable changes:
The Maverick is an all-new model for 2022, based on Ford’s Bronco Sport and Escape small SUVs.
Performance
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The hybrid version gets excellent fuel economy, eliminates the idle vibration of the 2.0T, and can scoot on electric power at low speed. But it only comes as a FWD.
Drivetrain
The optional 250-horsepower, 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder is well-matched to the size and weight of the Maverick. It gets off the line without hesitation, and provides decent mid-range thrust. We found that there’s just-robust-enough power for most driving situations, though it doesn’t have the power reserves of the Santa Cruz with its optional turbo engine. The Maverick’s engine can also sound wheezy and uninspiring.
The eight-speed automatic upshifts smoothly, and downshifts come in a timely and mostly smooth fashion. But there are certain situations, especially on secondary roads when driving at around 30-40 mph, that the transmission shifts into too tall of a gear, causing the engine to lug in an unrefined fashion which sends vibrations into the cabin. A minor press on the gas pedal usually brings a quick downshift, but it can still be a bit annoying.
Its 0 to 60 mph time of 7.1 seconds is competitive with other small-to-midsized trucks; it isn’t quite as quick as the speedy Santa Cruz, but it’s a hair quicker than the larger Ford Ranger, Honda Ridgeline, and Nissan Frontier. While the hybrid's power delivery benefits from an initial electric boost that feels very gratifying in a low speed, it's ultimately slower, hitting 0 to 60 mph in 8.3 seconds.
They hybrid model comes with a CVT, so there's no traditional steps between gears. Hence, it feels smooth and unobtrusive in low throttle applications. The hybrid also eliminates the lugging and associated resonance that the turbo version suffers from at low revs. With high power demands, such as having to merge or climb a hill, the transmission will elicit a pronounced engine moan, however.
Our tested all-wheel-drive model managed 23 mpg overall on regular fuel. That’s notably more frugal than traditional pickup trucks, and just 1-mpg shy of the slightly smaller Santa Cruz with its optional turbo engine. The Maverick’s stop/start system, which is designed to save fuel by shutting off the engine at stoplights, is nearly seamless, firing the engine back up super-quickly as soon as you take your foot off the brake pedal to get moving again.
But the Maverick fuel economy king is the hybrid model, which registered 37 mpg overall in our tests, making it far more efficient than any other pickup.
Handling
Both versions of the Maverick are competent little vehicles to drive around. This truck doesn’t turn into corners with quite the eagerness of the Santa Cruz, but there’s a responsiveness and tautness to it that our drivers appreciated.
Agility is a bit diminished compared to the Bronco Sport and Escape small SUVs it’s derived from, but it’s still head and shoulders above any traditional body-on-frame pickup when it comes to taking corners with verve. The Maverick’s steering has a natural heft to it (without feeling excessively heavy, such as in the Frontier) and it gives the driver a small amount of feedback about front-tire grip and road texture, which we appreciate. Good resistance to body lean through turns, a well-tuned electronic stability control (ESC) system, and the keen ability of the all-wheel-drive system to put the power down to all four tires exiting turns helped make the Maverick secure and confidence-inspiring around our track.
Our testers said it was easy to drive the truck through CR’s avoidance maneuver—a test which simulates swerving quickly, with a left-right-left steering sequence. And the Maverick’s speeds of 52.5 mph and 51.5 mph, for the turbo and hybrid versions respectively, are quite good for a pickup truck.
The little Ford instilled confidence when pushed hard around our twisty road-course track, with the front tires always losing traction well before the rear tires, which is a steady and safe attitude. The chassis was somewhat responsive to changes in throttle to curb the front-tire push, with small amounts of easy-to-control oversteer (which is when the rear tires lose grip, and step out slightly) induced, but the truck is far from sporty or fun to drive at its limits.
Ride comfort
The Maverick’s ride benefits from its car-based unibody construction, as opposed to the more rugged body-on-frame setup of traditional pickups. The ride is firm, but it gets less unruly over big bumps than most pickups. Some impacts, particularly at lower speeds, come through into the cabin, and there is some bounciness or abruptness to the ride at times. Still, within the world of pickups, the Maverick delivers one of the most civilized rides. We noticed occasional suspension noise when encountering harder-edged bumps, such as potholes, which make the Maverick feel a bit unrefined.
With different tires and weight distribution, the hybrid model felt more steady and composed and without the quick, short pitches that we found on the turbo AWD version.
Noise
Although road and tire noise are kept at acceptable levels inside the Maverick, elevated wind noise along with an engine that one tester described as “sounding like a turbocharged blender under the hood” make for a fairly loud experience on the highway. In fairness, the engine rarely gets boisterous, even during hard acceleration, it just has an industrial-like wheezy character that’s uninspiring. It also doesn’t help that the Maverick’s transmission logic often results in early upshifts, which causes the engine to “lug” at low revs, resulting in a vibration felt through the cabin. Wind noise on the highway creeps in mostly around the windshield pillars and from the side mirrors, and ambient air noise from the rear-seat area means occupants have to raise their voices to be heard.
The hybrid is a bit quieter than the regular Maverick XLT, thanks to its ability to drive under electric power at low speeds and because our tested Lariat trim’s acoustic-glass windshield cuts down on highway wind noise.
Braking
The Maverick turned in an excellent braking performance, managing short stops on both dry and wet surfaces. Stopping distances were consistent and the truck was very stable during these panic-brake tests. Out on the road, our drivers found the brake pedal for the non-hybrid easy to modulate, allowing you to stop exactly where you intended with minimal effort.
We were annoyed by the grabbiness of the hybrid’s brakes at low speeds, which can make it difficult to stop exactly where you want without adjusting your pressure on the pedal.
Driver assistance
Our Maverick was not equipped with an active driving assistance system, which is the combination of adaptive cruise control (ACC) and lane centering assistance (LCA). ACC is only optionally available on the top Lariat trim line.
Lane departure warning (LDW) and lane keeping assistance (LKA) come as part of the optional Ford Co-Pilot360 package. The LDW system warns the driver that the Maverick is crossing over a lane line by giving a visual alert and vibrating the steering wheel. The LKA system comes with two stages of warnings -- an orange warning within the instrument cluster with a light nudge of the steering wheel when close to the lane line, followed by a red warning within the instrument cluster and a stronger nudge of the steering wheel when on top of the lane line.
Headlights
We rated the Maverick’s LED headlights, which come standard on all trims, as only doing a “fair” job overall, the score limited mainly by the lack of low-beam illumination. As with most LED systems, the headlights provide a high level of intensity with a very white and bright light.
The low beams provide only “fair” levels of light straight ahead down the road. They don’t give enough light for the driver to adequately see, react, and brake for anything ahead when speeds reach about 60 mph. Sideward visibility was rated at “good,” which is lower than the levels of sideward visibility we typically see with better-performing LED headlights. Sideward visibility can help drivers see pedestrians and wildlife entering from the sides of the road, or in navigating corners.
In contrast, the high beams do a “very good” job of lighting the road ahead, although the distance is shorter than what most high beams achieve. Automatic high beams (which Ford refers to as “Auto Hi-Beam”) come standard across all Maverick trims. This system can help drivers take advantage of the additional visibility that high beams bring more frequently, as it automatically switches the high beams on anytime traffic and conditions allow—an especially important feature given the Maverick’s lack of low-beam visibility. We found that the system appropriately changed back and forth between low and high beams, but the automatic high beams have to be turned on by going through a setting within the instrument cluster, forcing extra searching for what should be a simple task, such as the press of a button on the dashboard.
The top Lariat trims also include wiper-activated headlights, a smart feature that assures the Maverick’s headlights are on in rainy weather, even if it's not nighttime.
Towing
The Maverick with the optional turbo four-cylinder and all-wheel drive can tow up to 4,000 pounds, when equipped with the 4K Tow package which adds a transmission oil cooler, a higher-capacity radiator, an upgraded cooling fan, shorter gearing, and a trailer brake controller. For comparison, the Hyundai Santa Cruz has the ability to tow a trailer of up to 5,000 pounds.
Since our tested Maverick wasn’t equipped with the towing package, our truck is only rated to tow 2,000 pounds, despite having the optional turbocharged engine and all-wheel drive. The hybrid version, which comes only with front-wheel drive, has a maximum tow rating of 2,000 pounds.
Off-road
Unlike most midsized pickups—and all full-sized trucks—that use a more sturdy body-on-frame construction and have robust four-wheel-drive systems, the Maverick isn’t intended for serious off-road duty. As such, we didn’t attempt to take our all-wheel-drive XLT up the Auto Test Center’s challenging Rock Hill. The Maverick has only modest ground clearance and long overhangs that would likely result in damaged body panels or other mechanical components. An FX4 off-road package is available that adds skid plates, all-terrain tires, and additional off-road-oriented drive modes, but the Maverick’s “off-road experience” is better suited to gravel roads, mild dirt trails, and other slippery surfaces.
Comfort & Convenience
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Controls are as easy to operate as they come.
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Unfortunately the tailgate is not damped like in many other trucks and slams open.
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The controls, including the infotainment screen and the climate system’s large knobs and physical buttons, are a breeze to use.
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Like many trucks, the Maverick has large storage bins underneath the rear seats.
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All Mavericks come with USB Type-A and Type-C ports up front. Lariat trims get additional rear-seat USB ports.
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Buyers have to choose the Lariat trim to get adaptive cruise control.
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Thanks to a laminated acoustic windshield, the Lariat is quieter than the XLT.
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The bed is small but deep. It is fitted with thoughtful details like lighting, bottle openers, and a 120V power outlet.
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Some staffers complained that their pocket book would catch on the door latch.
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Lariat models get a power sliding rear window that helps ventilation.
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The door pockets are extremely shallow, and we’d worry about them falling out when you open the door.


Interior fit and finish
The Maverick’s utilitarian interior is full of cheap, hollow-sounding plastic pieces, which isn’t surprising given its fairly low starting price. In truth, most pickups—even full-sized models—have lots of plastic panels compared with cars, and Ford did a good job of at least making the Maverick look unique, with items such as exposed screws on the door pulls and an interesting mix of colors and materials. We also appreciated the leather-wrapped steering wheel which comes as part of the XLT Luxury package; a urethane steering wheel comes standard on the base XL and XLT.
Most of the controls have a solid feel to them, but the climate control’s fan-speed and temperature knobs have mushy, undefined detents, which makes it too easy to turn the knob further than intended. We did find a fair amount of rough edges on the plastic panels here and there, and the instrument cluster shroud is pretty flimsy and poorly attached. The cloth seats in our XLT test model have a rather scratchy feel to them.
Our Lariat model came with faux leather seats, which felt a lot nicer than the scratchy fabric. However, most testers were underwhelmed with this Lariat trim—we expected more since this is the top-of-the-line model; there simply isn’t much here that justifies the price premium over the XLT.
Driving position
The Maverick’s driving position is similar to the Bronco Sport upon which it is based, which means it has an upright feel with a slightly elevated and commanding view of the road ahead. Headroom and space around the driver is plentiful, but the inability to independently tilt the leading edge of the bottom cushion made for a compromised position for some drivers. The center console is very low (more so than the Bronco Sport), which avoids right-knee intrusion issues for most drivers. The door- and center armrests are well-placed, but there isn’t enough padding on the door to give good elbow comfort for long drives. The steering column has adequate tilt and telescope range. While the left footrest is tall enough for large feet, it’s on the narrow side.
Visibility
The Maverick’s boxy pickup shape yields good outward visibility for the most part. The windshield is large and the view over the hood is aided by the flat, low dashboard. The windshield pillars get thick toward the base and, together with the side mirrors, form a good-sized blind spot that the driver has to peer around to see pedestrians and other vehicles when navigating intersections. The side windows are nice and tall, but the thick side pillars hamper over-the-shoulder views when changing lanes. The rear window in our tested XLT is a clean pane of glass, free of the sliding rear window bars that obstruct the views out the back of most pickups. The rear-seat headrests block the outer edges of the window, and they can’t be folded down when the seat isn’t in use.
Our hybrid Lariat model has a power sliding rear window, which results in a minor reduction in rear glass area compared to the XLT. The lack of a rear window defroster could be problematic in cold, icy conditions.
Seat comfort and access
The XLT’s front seats are fairly basic and proved only marginally comfortable for most drivers. While the seatback is well-bolstered, and we appreciate that the eight-way power-adjustable driver’s seat in our XLT with the Luxury package has two-way lumbar, the bottom cushion is short, a bit narrow, and flat. As such, there’s only minimal thigh support, which compromises comfort on longer drives. The front passenger seat has six-way manual adjustments. The top Lariat trim offers the same level of cushion adjustments, only adding four-way head restraints.
Available only as a crew cab, the Maverick’s rear seat is good-sized considering how small the vehicle is, making it usable for kids, or adults on shorter trips. There’s plenty of headroom and foot space underneath the front seats, and the angled-back bottom cushion gives good thigh support. But legroom is tight for taller passengers, and the upright seatback—the angle of which can’t be adjusted—can get uncomfortable on long trips. We do appreciate that padded door armrests made their way into the second row. Unlike most pickups, it’s easy to get in and out of the Maverick due to its low floor height. The front seats are positioned at around hip height for most adults and combined with tall doors with wide openings this makes it easy to slide right into the seat. Shorter-legged occupants might brush a pants leg on the rocker panel getting back out. It’s pretty easy to get in and out of the rear seat, too, with the biggest obstacle being the tight knee space due to the close proximity of the front seats. The door openings are also a bit narrower but the seat cushion is, again, an easy height to slide over and onto.
Usability
Most of the Maverick’s controls are basic but functional and easy to use. This includes the infotainment touch screen as well as the climate system’s large knobs and physical buttons. The media controls are split between the left and right sides of the steering wheel, causing some searching for functions while driving. The instrument cluster is basic, but also easy to use.
The climate system’s “mode man” allows for individual adjustment of the air flow, making it easy to distinguish between the head, feet, etc. without needing a menu screen. Having three fan speeds to choose from for “Auto” mode was appreciated by testers.
We did have a few relatively minor quibbles. For instance, the headlight dial is blocked by the left side of the steering wheel, and the automatic high beams have to be turned on by going through a setting within the instrument cluster, forcing extra searching for what should be a simple task, such as pressing a button on the dashboard. The button to activate the hazard lights—located in the middle of the media controls on the center stack—is too small, making it difficult to find quickly. Also, the inner door pull’s open-hook setup requires that front occupants grab a very specific location to close the door, and it can catch purse handles and keychains when entering the vehicle.
Infotainment
The Maverick uses a simplified version of Ford’s familiar and easy-to-use Sync 3 infotainment system. The full version of Sync 3 is optional on the top Lariat trim, and that is the only way to get SiriusXM satellite radio. The system is logically organized and simple to navigate, aided by large fonts and buttons. Most vehicle settings are accessed within the touch screen but there’s minimal available customization of the system itself; for example, you can’t rearrange the menu icons as you can with some systems. The screen isn’t tilted toward the driver, which gives both the driver and passenger equal access. But, it’s positioned in a completely vertical fashion, which can be awkward for those who prefer to have a perch for their wrist while interacting with the screen. The system can be slow to respond at times, but most functions have redundant physical controls and the climate system is completely separate, which limits frustration. There doesn’t appear to be an anti-glare coating on the screen, and as such we found that it can get washed out and become very difficult to read in bright, direct sunlight.
Phone
Pairing Bluetooth devices is simple and wired Android Auto and Apple CarPlay compatibility come standard on all trims. Initiating phone calls can be done through the instrument cluster by using the steering-wheel controls (rather than having to go through the infotainment screen), which means you can keep your hands on the wheel. But it does require a few steps to navigate to the phone menu, instead of simply pressing a dedicated phone button. Wireless Android Auto and Apple CarPlay are not available. A wireless charger is only optional on the top Lariat trim. Also, the Lariat trim includes phone controls within the instrument cluster for easier dialing without taking your hands off the wheel.
Connectivity
Every Maverick is compatible with the free FordPass app that allows you to lock/unlock, locate, and start your vehicle. We like that these remote functions do not cost extra as they do with many other vehicles. The FordPass app ran well on our iPhone, and connected reliably to the vehicle. The remote-start and door-lock controls are presented on the first page of the app when you open it, but there are a lot of other features and menus that can take time to sort through and learn. All Mavericks come with USB Type-A and Type-C ports up front. Lariat trims get additional rear-seat USB ports.
Climate features
The XLT comes with a single-zone automatic climate system. Our test truck was equipped with the optional XLT Luxury package, which includes heat for the front seats, steering wheel, and side mirrors. We appreciate that the climate controls are physical buttons and knobs, rather than of the touch-screen variety—this makes for a more precise and consistent action. The remote-start system pre-conditions the cabin, triggering the heated seats and steering wheel—both of which get very warm very quickly. Our top-shelf Lariat comes standard with a dual-zone automatic climate system. We added the extra-cost Lariat Luxury package, which includes heated exterior mirrors, heated front seats, heated steering wheel, and a heated section of the windshield where the wipers park.
Cabin storage
Front passengers get several open bins in the center console, as well as a deep covered storage bin under the padded armrest between the seats. Most of the bins have a grippy rubber padding, which helps keep items from sliding around. The door pockets are extremely shallow, which is surprising for a utilitarian vehicle such as a pickup—you’d be hard-pressed to stash much more than a pair of thick winter gloves in there, and we’d worry about them falling out when you open the door. The XLT comes with a single storage pocket behind the front passenger seat; the Lariat has pockets behind both seats. Like many trucks, the Maverick has large storage bins underneath the rear seats.
Cup holders
Front passengers get two cup holders located next to the gear selector dial on the center console, each with grippy rubber bases and plastic anti-tip measures to help hold drinks in place. Rear-seat occupants have two cup holders nestled into the fold-down center armrest. All four doors include built-in bottle holders.
Cargo area
Considering that the Maverick’s bed is only 4.5-feet long—a foot shorter than the smallest bed available on the full-sized F-150—the total volume, at 26 cubic-feet, is good-sized and fairly useful. For comparison, that’s about one-and-a-half times the cubic-volume of the Hyundai Santa Cruz’s 4-foot-long bed.
The Maverick’s low bed height makes it easy to load, especially compared to full-sized pickups and most traditional midsized trucks. For example, the side rails are low enough that you can access the bed by reaching over them. There are handy sliding tie-down rings that let you adjust your anchor points, and an attempt was made to extract more usefulness from the bed’s dimensions with molded-in pockets designed to fit typical 2x4 and 2x6 boards, enabling the bed to be partitioned in various configurations to suit your storage needs. There’s also a bed light and a 120-volt outlet.
The tailgate can be positioned at an upward angle which, in conjunction with the tops of the rear wheel wells and ratchet straps, makes it possible to carry standard 4x8 sheets of plywood. But alas, the tailgate doesn’t have a damped opening, unlike most trucks these days, but at least it’s very light and easy to lift up.
Spare tire
A temporary spare tire is standard. A full-size spare is optional on all trims.
Driver Assist Systems & Crash Protection
Crash-test results
Neither the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) nor the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) have crash-tested the Maverick yet.
Crash-avoidance systems
Standard active safety features on the Maverick include forward collision warning and automatic emergency braking with pedestrian detection. Blind spot warning and rear cross traffic warning are optional as part of the Ford Co-Pilot360 package.
Forward collision warning (FCW) and automatic emergency braking (AEB) with pedestrian detection -- These systems monitor for vehicles and pedestrians ahead, and are designed to reduce the likelihood and/or severity of frontal crashes. FCW and AEB—which Ford refers to as “Pre-Collision Assist”—recognize vehicles ahead when the Maverick is traveling between 3 to 75 mph. The FCW will alert the driver with audible and visual warnings if the system senses a potential collision. The AEB will be initiated if the driver fails to react to the system’s warnings in time to help mitigate the anticipated crash. The pedestrian detection system is active between 3 to 50 mph.
Blind spot warning (BSW) -- If another vehicle is traveling in a lane beside the Maverick, potentially hidden in a blind spot, the BSW system lights up a small yellow icon in the corresponding side mirror to warn of a vehicle in an adjacent lane. The icon will flash quickly if the driver starts to move over into an already-occupied lane.
Rear cross traffic warning (RCTW) -- When in Reverse, this system scans for vehicles approaching from behind the Maverick and will give audible and visual warnings to help get the driver’s attention. The BSW icons will light up in the side mirrors, and an arrow will appear in the backup camera screen pointing to the direction the vehicle is approaching from. This is a very handy feature when backing out of a tight parking space, or when reversing from a blind driveway out onto a busy road.
Crash notification
There isn’t a built-in modem to enable SOS functionality, like there is in many other vehicles. Automatic Collision Notification (911 Assist, as Ford calls it) requires an active Bluetooth phone connection, which is generally less reliable than an integrated system. However, unlike many competitors, Ford doesn’t charge extra for this feature. We like that a pop-up on the center infotainment screen asks if you would like to enable it when you pair your device, something we recommend all Maverick owners do.
Rollaway risk
The Maverick’s electronic rotary gear selector dial meets CR’s rollaway-risk requirements. If the driver fails to select Park and the vehicle is left in Reverse or Drive when the ignition is turned off, or the driver’s door is opened, the transmission will automatically shift into Park.
Child safety
Overall, car seats were mostly easy to secure with the vehicle belt, with the exception of some infant seats. Lower anchors are available in the outboard seats and center-seat lower-anchor borrowing is allowed if the car-seat manufacturer allows for non-standard lower anchor spacing. Tether attachment is a bit cumbersome but not impossible. Three car seats will fit across this rear seat.
Lower anchors are available and exposed at the seat crease in the outboard seats. They are close to the seat cushion and a little deep, so you may need to twist to remove the connectors. Center LATCH installations are allowed by Ford by borrowing the inboard lower anchors if the car seat manufacturer also allows for LATCH installation with non-standard spacing.
Tether anchors are exposed behind the seat on the back wall of the truck, which makes it difficult to fully tighten the tether. The tether should be routed under the outboard head restraint. The Maverick owner’s manual says the tether should be routed over the head restraint in the center seat, but a spokesperson from Ford told CR that the tether can be routed under a raised center head restraint.
It’s hard to balance a child seat on the vehicle seat while trying to attach to the tether anchor behind the seatback, with the seatback folded forward. Also, the tether has to be twisted to get the hook into the proper orientation illustrated by the Maverick owner’s manual, but it’s important to note that for proper child-passenger safety, the tether strap should not be twisted. It’s also difficult to get the rear seat latched against the back wall after tether attachment.
Some infant seat designs could not be installed securely with the vehicle belt in the rear seat because of the tall, floppy buckles and wide belt-anchor spacing. Others can be securely installed with some extra effort.
Rear-facing convertibles were easy to install with the vehicle belt in all rear seating positions.
Forward-facing car seats were easy to secure with the vehicle belt in the rear seats.
Booster use
The rear head restraints will need to be removed to accommodate a highback booster. Boosters fit on the second-row outboard seat and sit stably. The outboard buckle recesses a little as you try to buckle it, which may make it a bit more challenging for a kid to do on their own.
In the rear center seat, a booster may have to be shifted a little towards the left outboard seat to access the center buckle, but not enough to prevent a left outboard occupant. Two hands are needed to buckle in the rear center seat.
Rear occupant alert
The Maverick lacks Ford’s end-of-trip alert system that reminds drivers to check the rear seat for occupants—it comes standard on other models, such as the Bronco Sport. That’s an oversight, because this rear-door-logic system could help prevent kids and pets from dying when left in hot cars.
Rear head restraints
The rear center head restraint needs to be raised for safe usage. The outboard head restraints are tall enough for adults and kids to use safely.
Rear belt minder
Ford’s rear belt minder system alerts the driver when a rear passenger unbuckles by giving audible alerts and visual warnings within the instrument cluster. But, the rear center seat is not included in the rear belt minder in the Maverick, which is a glaring omission. Additionally, the Maverick system differs from other Ford rear belt minders because it doesn’t allow the driver to dismiss the belt minder, which would be helpful if a rear passenger exited the vehicle, or accidently used the wrong buckle.
Advanced rear restraints
The rear outboard seats have seat-belt pretensioners and load-limiters providing additional protection for belted rear occupants.
Warranty
All cars come with basic warranty coverage, also known as a bumper-to-bumper warranty. This protects consumers against unexpected problems with non-wear items. Powertrain warranty protects against engine and transmission troubles. Rust through, or corrosion warranty, covers rust to non-damaged components. Roadside aid provides on-location assistance in case of a breakdown and may include limited towing services.
Extended warranties provide peace of mind. Owners of models known to have worse-than-average predicted reliability can mitigate risks with an extended warranty. Generally, we recommend buying a model with better-than-average reliability and skipping this expensive add on. If you do buy an extended warranty, it is key to read the small print to understand what is covered and where you can bring the car for repairs.
Basic
3 years/36,000 miles
Drivetrain
5 years/60,000 miles
Corrosion
5 years/unlimited miles
Hybrid
8 years/100,000 miles
Roadside Aid
Wow, that took some non-trivial time to cut, paste and reformat that whole article. Thanks. It was more than I wanted to tackle.

And Consumer Reports tests are just another data point. Like anything else, you weigh it against other evidence.
 

TyPope

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Wow, that took some non-trivial time to cut, paste and reformat that whole article. Thanks. It was more than I wanted to tackle.

And Consumer Reports tests are just another data point. Like anything else, you weigh it against other evidence.
to be fair, I just dragged the curser over all the text and hit <cntrl-v> and then <cntrl -p>.
But, thanks! Glad to be a helpful contributor.
 
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OP
davnau

davnau

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to be fair, I just dragged the curser over all the text and hit <cntrl-v> and then <cntrl -p>.
But, thanks! Glad to be a helpful contributor.
You know what, you are right. I was thinking all the graphs and tables were in that section, but rather, they are in the Ratings & Specs section, in which there are separate sub-sections. It's after you click "View All Ratings & Test Results" button in the Ratings & Specs section, that you have to chose EB or Hybrid, shown as " Crew Cab XLT 4-Cyl 8-Speed Automatic" (does not actually say EB) or "Crew Cab Lariat 4-Cyl CVT" (does not actually say "Hybrid", but I guess implied) then view the relevant bar charts and tables of data. Reliability and Owner Satisfaction sections are both basically empty, except for CU's guess of average reliability, based on other Ford products on the same platform, plus the Ranger.

So, again, thanks. I was wrong. It was easier to do than I remembered.
 
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Mikknj

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IF CR used aesthetics in their ratings, the Ridgeline would be a lot lower -- that's the ugliest truck I've ever seen, it's like a visual nails-on-the-chalkboard for me. The automotive press love it, but the sales level implies that the public doesn't.
I like the look of the ridgeline well enough, it needs something - yes.. But I much prefer the Maverick. I don't like the upscale bones, leather everywhere and space age interior of the ridgeline. Trucks are supposed to be utilitarian and kept dirty, or at least in no need of fastidious primping.
 

MLA62563

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I like the look of the ridgeline well enough, it needs something - yes.. But I much prefer the Maverick. I don't like the upscale bones, leather everywhere and space age interior of the ridgeline. Trucks are supposed to be utilitarian and kept dirty, or at least in no need of fastidious primping.
Agreed. Yes, the old Ridgeline with its weird buttressing behind the cab was exceptionally ugly. So much so that every time I saw one going by, my first thought was "Seriously??...Somebody actually thought this was a good idea??". 😲
But credit where credit is due, they figured it out, and the new model is decent looking.

 

 
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