2.5l Hybrid

zeketolliver

Well-known member
First Name
Jake
Joined
Apr 12, 2021
Messages
52
Reaction score
64
Location
Columbus, OH
Vehicle(s)
2013 Honda Insight
Ford is confident in the Hybrid components it looks like

Warranty and Maintenance Coverage
The Maverick offers the same standard warranty package of other new Fords, which is fairly basic and offers no complimentary scheduled maintenance program.

  • Limited warranty covers 3 years or 36,000 miles
  • Powertrain warranty covers 5 years or 60,000 miles
  • Hybrid component warranty covers 8 years or 100,000 miles
  • No complimentary scheduled maintenance
If I were hyper-focused on getting a new small AWD pickup, I'd probably be going with the Santa Cruz, primarily because of their 10yr 100,000mi warranty. The F150 Lighting is something I would LOOVE to have, but I can't fathom having a car payment that is higher than my mortgage (of course, my mortgage is lower than most pay for rent, but that's a story for a different forum). I was still a little skeptical about getting a Ford hybrid, until I noticed the 100k mi Hybrid warranty Ford offers. So, when Ford announced their base engine as the Hybrid I was like "What? FRICK YEAH!!"
 

NavyBob

Well-known member
First Name
Bob
Joined
Jan 21, 2021
Messages
56
Reaction score
108
Location
TN
Vehicle(s)
2019 Ranger XL
This is a great little truck, although I am perplexed about why Ford isn't offering a hybrid AWD version out of the gate since they already have it for the Escape. This will be a hunting truck for me so I will be holding out for AWD. I would prefer plug-in AWD but would probably go for the hybrid AWD since the mileage is so much better than any other truck on the road.
I read that Ford did not want to "jerry rig" the escape unit into the Maverick but wanted to design the AWD to the Maverick.
 

FirstOnRaceDay

Well-known member
First Name
Devin
Joined
Jun 2, 2021
Messages
194
Reaction score
180
Location
Toledo Ohio
Vehicle(s)
2000 Mercury Grand Marquis LS
I read that Ford did not want to "jerry rig" the escape unit into the Maverick but wanted to design the AWD to the Maverick.
Exactly. They want a more capable awd system. Hence the higher towing cap vs escape hybrid FWD.
so designing a new system cost money. They want some money back before they invest that much.
 

TooManyVehicles

Active member
First Name
John
Joined
Jun 5, 2021
Messages
28
Reaction score
30
Location
Upstate NY
Vehicle(s)
2015 Ford F150 XLT, 2006 Subaru Outback
... I can't bring myself to dealing with the atrocious MPG 4wd trucks get. I had planned on getting a Tuscon, or Rav4 hybrid next year when I buy, but I'd much, much rather have a high-trim Maverick hybrid FWD for the utility of the truck bed.
My F150 w/3.5L Eco-Boost 4WD has averaged just north of 20 MPG over its lifetime (65k miles). Half of those miles have been in the winter with E rated Nokiam snows plus 400# of weight in the bed. While I think the AWD Mavericks MPG will be better, from what I've read it won't be tons better.

Having said that, one thing is for sure with the Eco-Boost engines. It is ECO, or BOOST, not both at the same time. I'm pretty good at not getting too much on it and try to keep in under 75 on the Interstate. For a while, I kept a boost gauge mounted in it (using an old Android phone + ECM Ultra Gauge Blue) and it became quite apparent that it didn't take much to get the boost going and the MPG dropping).
 

FirstOnRaceDay

Well-known member
First Name
Devin
Joined
Jun 2, 2021
Messages
194
Reaction score
180
Location
Toledo Ohio
Vehicle(s)
2000 Mercury Grand Marquis LS
My F150 w/3.5L Eco-Boost 4WD has averaged just north of 20 MPG over its lifetime (65k miles). Half of those miles have been in the winter with E rated Nokiam snows plus 400# of weight in the bed. While I think the AWD Mavericks MPG will be better, from what I've read it won't be tons better.

Having said that, one thing is for sure with the Eco-Boost engines. It is ECO, or BOOST, not both at the same time. I'm pretty good at not getting too much on it and try to keep in under 75 on the Interstate. For a while, I kept a boost gauge mounted in it (using an old Android phone + ECM Ultra Gauge Blue) and it became quite apparent that it didn't take much to get the boost going and the MPG dropping).
the turbos in the ecoboost are SMALL! peak torque from 1500-4500rpm in most cases. Meaning BOOST. So you really have to keep the revs Down to keep out of boost.
Which is why Ford only offers 10 speed or 8 speed transmissions. Keep the revs down every shift
 

808Rider

Member
First Name
Gee
Joined
Jun 11, 2021
Messages
10
Reaction score
6
Location
Honolulu, Hawaii
Vehicle(s)
4Runner
I just hope it really gets close to the target 40mpg. That's one of the biggest draws for me. That's better than most gas compact cars, like the Accord and Camry
 

Shecster

New member
Joined
Jun 10, 2021
Messages
4
Reaction score
5
Location
Northern California
Vehicle(s)
1930 Model A Ford - 1971 Ford Maverick
most of those problems were with the Cmax. Fords first test with this set up. It was overhauled for the Fusion. No major transmission issues there. Many reports of 200k+ miles with no major issues.
Correct information on the updated Fusion. Whole I was still working (retired😎 now), my employer had a good mix of Toyota Camry Hybrids and the Ford Fusion Hybrid. Smoking fast in the Fords and they seem to handle quite a bit of the guys with the mindset.... “it’s not my car, so what” as they punished the drivetrain. Similar to the Camry drivetrain as far as reliability.

Yes it’s all a risk but I’m glad they are not talking about stop/start technology for the Maverick. At least nothing I’ve read so far. Fingers crossed!
 

hondabuster

Member
First Name
Andy
Joined
Jun 14, 2021
Messages
9
Reaction score
10
Location
Minnesota
Vehicle(s)
Rav hybrid ,tacoma
There tons of explanation videos on both Toyota and Ford eCVT which are very similar. One thing that is said often in the videos is how simple the transmissions are... simple usually means reliable.
I have a Rav4 hybrid, and its a lifetime tranny. No wear parts, just gears and fluids. Nothing to wear out, no belts or rubber bands, nothing in common with the Nissan unit, other than sharing the CVT name
 

dp4616

Active member
First Name
Daniel
Joined
Jan 13, 2021
Messages
42
Reaction score
62
Location
Sunrise, FL
Vehicle(s)
2011 Ford Ranger
Yea. The more I research, the more confident I am. Looking into the CMAX pre2016 and was a disaster. Nothing much about the eCVT nowadays. The way it works also makes me less concerned about trailering or lifetime trans fluid.
 

AceGoliath

New member
First Name
Charles
Joined
Jun 15, 2021
Messages
2
Reaction score
0
Location
Illinois
Vehicle(s)
13 F150 FX4, 10 Fusion SE, 22 Bronco OBX 4DR Order
This will be my first venture into a hybrid. Question about powertrain.

If say the batteries degrade to a point where they won't hold charge.

or

The electric motor burns out.

Would the vehicle still run just on the gas engine? Or are you broke down? Thanks
 

SuckLemons

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 29, 2021
Messages
66
Reaction score
57
Location
Tennessee
Vehicle(s)
Lexus
This will be my first venture into a hybrid. Question about powertrain.

If say the batteries degrade to a point where they won't hold charge.

or

The electric motor burns out.

Would the vehicle still run just on the gas engine? Or are you broke down? Thanks
I don’t think this is a concern like it used to be. I had a 2009 (?) Escape Hybrid with 260,000 miles on it and never had an issue. Battery still ran fine. I’m sure it degraded so it wasn’t as efficient as new, but it performed normally. Running a 2012 hybrid now with 140,000 miles and haven’t had an issue either. This is a Toyota/Lexus, but still, if you’re worried about battery degradation, I wouldn’t.
 

FirstOnRaceDay

Well-known member
First Name
Devin
Joined
Jun 2, 2021
Messages
194
Reaction score
180
Location
Toledo Ohio
Vehicle(s)
2000 Mercury Grand Marquis LS
This will be my first venture into a hybrid. Question about powertrain.

If say the batteries degrade to a point where they won't hold charge.

or

The electric motor burns out.

Would the vehicle still run just on the gas engine? Or are you broke down? Thanks
most new lithium batteries in hybrids or EVs still have 80%-90% capacity after 200k miles. So a 1.4kwh battery means 1.12kwh after 200k miles. That’s more than enough to last.

as for the motor 200k miles is more than enough for those to last. After that it may cause issues. But the vehicle will not work with out the electric motor since it controls the transmission. But seeing reports of the Fusion Hybrid hitting 200k miles-300k miles with NO major issues.
 

RobBot

Member
First Name
Rob
Joined
Jun 12, 2021
Messages
7
Reaction score
10
Location
Texas
Vehicle(s)
2007 Toyota Tacoma
This will be my first venture into a hybrid. Question about powertrain.

If say the batteries degrade to a point where they won't hold charge.

or

The electric motor burns out.

Would the vehicle still run just on the gas engine? Or are you broke down? Thanks
I believe you'd be broken down. I believe the gas engine only acts as a generator, it doesn't have a connection to the wheels.

The wheels are driven by an electric motor.

Like other people said though, they should work for a long time.
 

oljackfrost

Well-known member
First Name
Mark
Joined
Mar 9, 2021
Messages
189
Reaction score
293
Location
Minnesota
Vehicle(s)
Subaru Impreza
I believe you'd be broken down. I believe the gas engine only acts as a generator, it doesn't have a connection to the wheels.

The wheels are driven by an electric motor.

Like other people said though, they should work for a long time.
Actually in a hybrid the gas engine is connected to the drivetrain. At low speeds the electric motor can power the vehicle. Under some conditions the hybrid system switches back and forth between the electric and gas units. When full power is called for, both electric and gas operate at the same time. The gas engine does add charge to the battery under some conditions and regenerative braking also adds charge. The Chevy Volt operates like you said.
 
Top