2.5l Hybrid

NDL

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I know there were some large taxi fleets using basically the same hybrid platform on Escapes. I don't recall the source but remember reading that many of the hybrid taxis had very high mileage, like 200-300K miles+.
Appreciate you edifying me
 

James

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I know nothing about Hybrid Vehicles. Can someone explain what a 94KW motor is, how much power it has, how it compares to other hybrid vehicles. voltage, amperage, how battery is charged, etc. Any information would be helpful. Is their a separate battery to start the 2.5l motor? Thanks
 

FirstOnRaceDay

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I know nothing about Hybrid Vehicles. Can someone explain what a 94KW motor is, how much power it has, how it compares to other hybrid vehicles. voltage, amperage, how battery is charged, etc. Any information would be helpful. Is their a separate battery to start the 2.5l motor? Thanks
because power is more efficient in an electric motor. You can calculate power out put from Volts x amps =watts (1000watts =kw)

now translating KWH to HP is roughly 1:1.3 so not that different . 94kw is roughly 120hp.
Now because electric motors operate completely different from gas cars. Their curve is different. Also some of the Motors power is going to the transmission to change gears. Making that total output only 200hp.

As for similar hybrids, Toyota RAV4 with a 120KW motor. (Slightly more amps)

there is a separate traditional 12v battery in most hybrids. Maverick included.

now how the system works is, it’s a traditional gas car with a traditional automatic transmission. But instead of Solenoids in the transmission it has the electric motor to change gears. Adding power and giving you a CVT. now how it regenerates power is from, when you are slowing down the electric motor will free spin allowing the drive wheels to turn the transmission and thus turn the electric motor. All while not effecting the gas motor.

everything is all connected all the time. And is very efficient.

virtually all Toyota hybrids (the king of hybrids) run this same system
 

James

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because power is more efficient in an electric motor. You can calculate power out put from Volts x amps =watts (1000watts =kw)

now translating KWH to HP is roughly 1:1.3 so not that different . 94kw is roughly 120hp.
Now because electric motors operate completely different from gas cars. Their curve is different. Also some of the Motors power is going to the transmission to change gears. Making that total output only 200hp.

As for similar hybrids, Toyota RAV4 with a 120KW motor. (Slightly more amps)

there is a separate traditional 12v battery in most hybrids. Maverick included.

now how the system works is, it’s a traditional gas car with a traditional automatic transmission. But instead of Solenoids in the transmission it has the electric motor to change gears. Adding power and giving you a CVT. now how it regenerates power is from, when you are slowing down the electric motor will free spin allowing the drive wheels to turn the transmission and thus turn the electric motor. All while not effecting the gas motor.

everything is all connected all the time. And is very efficient.

virtually all Toyota hybrids (the king of hybrids) run this same system
Thank You that answers a lot of concerns
 

NDL

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A cursory search on Ford's HF35 transmission reveals A LOT of PROBLEMS.

I don't like what I am reading; the internet abounds with bad info, much as the unit that was put into the Taurus - a notorious failure.
 
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because power is more efficient in an electric motor. You can calculate power out put from Volts x amps =watts (1000watts =kw)

now translating KWH to HP is roughly 1:1.3 so not that different . 94kw is roughly 120hp.
Now because electric motors operate completely different from gas cars. Their curve is different. Also some of the Motors power is going to the transmission to change gears. Making that total output only 200hp.

As for similar hybrids, Toyota RAV4 with a 120KW motor. (Slightly more amps)

there is a separate traditional 12v battery in most hybrids. Maverick included.

now how the system works is, it’s a traditional gas car with a traditional automatic transmission. But instead of Solenoids in the transmission it has the electric motor to change gears. Adding power and giving you a CVT. now how it regenerates power is from, when you are slowing down the electric motor will free spin allowing the drive wheels to turn the transmission and thus turn the electric motor. All while not effecting the gas motor.

everything is all connected all the time. And is very efficient.

virtually all Toyota hybrids (the king of hybrids) run this same system
I'm still a bit confused on what kind of performance we can expect, some places i read slow acceleration, some places I read peppy acceleration, most sources say 8.9 seconds 0-60, does the electric motor provide any instant torque? or are we actually driving with >162hp at all times?
 

FirstOnRaceDay

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A cursory search on Ford's HF35 transmission reveals A LOT of PROBLEMS.

I don't like what I am reading; the internet abounds with bad info, much as the unit that was put into the Taurus - a notorious failure.
most of those problems were with the Cmax. Fords first test with this set up. It was overhauled for the Fusion. No major transmission issues there. Many reports of 200k+ miles with no major issues.
 

FirstOnRaceDay

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I'm still a bit confused on what kind of performance we can expect, some places i read slow acceleration, some places I read peppy acceleration, most sources say 8.9 seconds 0-60, does the electric motor provide any instant torque? or are we actually driving with >162hp at all times?
Escape FWD Hybrid does
0-60 in 8.7. Quarter mile in 14.6
Maverick will likely be a few tenths slower so yea. 8.9 sounds right and just under 15s quarter.


the electric motor does provide instant torque the problem is the electric motor is running through a 10:1 gear set and it has to control the transmission. Which likely has a 4:1 low end. So yea your getting a lot of torque just slow torque.
 

oljackfrost

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There tons of explanation videos on both Toyota and Ford eCVT which are very similar. One thing that is said often in the videos is how simple the transmissions are... simple usually means reliable.
Not happy about lifetime trans fluid, especially with the thought of towing
I’m wondering if they still can change trans fluid on request, even if they call it “lifetime “. Or is the trans sealed?
 

ElMaverick

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Escape FWD Hybrid does
0-60 in 8.7. Quarter mile in 14.6
Maverick will likely be a few tenths slower so yea. 8.9 sounds right and just under 15s quarter.


the electric motor does provide instant torque the problem is the electric motor is running through a 10:1 gear set and it has to control the transmission. Which likely has a 4:1 low end. So yea your getting a lot of torque just slow torque.
Thank you for the detailed answer!

The gas engine sounds very unstressed, which should be good for reliability, but I do wonder if a tune plus all that low end torque could bump up those figures??...maybe I'll just go test drive an escape Hybrid to get a feel 😁
 

FirstOnRaceDay

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I’m wondering if they still can change trans fluid on request, even if they call it “lifetime “. Or is the trans sealed?
You can. It’s just not like most transmissions where you have to change it every 50k miles (recommended by manufacturers)

there’s no drain plug however. You have to drop the pan
 

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because power is more efficient in an electric motor. You can calculate power out put from Volts x amps =watts (1000watts =kw)

now translating KWH to HP is roughly 1:1.3 so not that different . 94kw is roughly 120hp.
Now because electric motors operate completely different from gas cars. Their curve is different. Also some of the Motors power is going to the transmission to change gears. Making that total output only 200hp.

As for similar hybrids, Toyota RAV4 with a 120KW motor. (Slightly more amps)

there is a separate traditional 12v battery in most hybrids. Maverick included.

now how the system works is, it’s a traditional gas car with a traditional automatic transmission. But instead of Solenoids in the transmission it has the electric motor to change gears. Adding power and giving you a CVT. now how it regenerates power is from, when you are slowing down the electric motor will free spin allowing the drive wheels to turn the transmission and thus turn the electric motor. All while not effecting the gas motor.

everything is all connected all the time. And is very efficient.

virtually all Toyota hybrids (the king of hybrids) run this same system
Does a hybrid vehicle run on it's main battery until the battery is low, then get power from the gas engine?
 

FirstOnRaceDay

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Does a hybrid vehicle run on it's main battery until the battery is low, then get power from the gas engine?
No that’s what a plug in hybrid is or PHEV. It’s just a regular hybrid where the gas and electric motor are both always running and working together to get you the best mpg.
 

LUVHunting

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This is a great little truck, although I am perplexed about why Ford isn't offering a hybrid AWD version out of the gate since they already have it for the Escape. This will be a hunting truck for me so I will be holding out for AWD. I would prefer plug-in AWD but would probably go for the hybrid AWD since the mileage is so much better than any other truck on the road.
 

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I'm not getting the make or break importance some people are placing on having hybrid AND AWD AND high payload/towing capacity in a budget vehicle already loaded with nice features and maximum utility. Who else offers that? Seems unrealistic. How many times a year are you going to tow anything more than a light utility trailer on a big box store run? How many horse trailers, U-hauls, camping trailers uses do you have in an average year? Subaru sells lots of symmetrical AWD economy vehicles with minimal towing capability that don't have close to the flexibility of this brand new Trucklett for lots more $ than this entry level hybrid. Are people confusing their "wants" with their actual needs for a vehicle in this price range? There's no perfect vehicle that does everything for everybody and starts at $20k :unsure:

I am one who doesn't *need* AWD. I am simply a 42y/o dude who has always wanted an AWD/4WD vehicle, but I've never had it. I am absolutely stoked about the Maverick. I am stoked about the base 2.5l hybrid engine. I would love to have AWD, but I'm not giving up the fuel economy of a hybrid to get it.

I started looking/researching vehicles early this year, because my family is outgrowing my 2013 Honda Insight, plus my Insight has taken a bit of a beating (inside and out) over the last 5 years, and I've never really liked how it drives.

For the majority of buyers (given more people live in the city and suburbs than in the country), they will never need anything more than the Maverick FWD Hybrid offers. The only 2 reasons I've never bought a truck for a daily driver are: 1. I refuse to drive a RWD in the snow if I can avoid it, and 2. I can't bring myself to dealing with the atrocious MPG 4wd trucks get. I had planned on getting a Tuscon, or Rav4 hybrid next year when I buy, but I'd much, much rather have a high-trim Maverick hybrid FWD for the utility of the truck bed.
 
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