Maverick Hybrid Confirmed

the1mrb

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I would like to see just a Hybrid option, not plug in. I have a 2014 Cmax and my overall MPG is 44, which includes driving in winter and summer. From what I understand there is no tax incentive for just the hybrid model.
I have a feeling there will be both, at least for the first generation. Same as the Escape currently has. Maybe not the first model year, though a standard hybrid has been "confirmed" initially.

For me, the beauty of the plug-in hybrid is the ability to force it to use electric only. But then still have the safety net of hybrid driving after that. That way I can essentially drive to/from work completely on electric only, and recharge at night in my garage. Essentially never using an ounce of fuel during the week like my wife does in her Escape Hybrid.
 

MontanaEd

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For me, the beauty of the plug-in hybrid is the ability to force it to use electric only. But then still have the safety net of hybrid driving after that. That way I can essentially drive to/from work completely on electric only, and recharge at night in my garage. Essentially never using an ounce of fuel during the week like my wife does in her Escape Hybrid.
So true. If you can plug in and charge at night or at work you don't use much gas at all with a plug in hybrid.

On the topic of reduced milage in the Winter. I drive a plug in hybrid which is EPA rated at 35 miles of all electric range (2013 Chevy Volt). That range drops to 25 miles in cold temps and the gas engine will kick on and off to warm the battery. In the Summer, that range goes up to 45 miles. But even in the coldest months (yes it does get cold in Montana) I buy maybe one tank of gas a month. The Volt allows me to drive all electric or change a mode and lock out the battery so I use the electricity generated by the gas engine. I love this flexibility and control. I really hope whatever system goes into the Maverick allows the ability to choose all electric or all gas. Why? Who would not want to be able to save the silent electric power until they got to the dirt roads. Quiet vehicles spook the deer, elk and bison less.
 

Dan_E26

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Since it's looking like there's no hope for a manual offering, I'm starting to consider the hybrid. Why not get better MPGs if they're all automatics anyway? Plus, you get a small power and torque bump over the base powertrain which is always appreciated.

My main concern is how it's gonna feel to drive. Rather than a standard torque converter it has an "eCVT", and I've heard conflicting information on how it behaves. Some say it basically feels like an electric car while others say its sluggish, droney and slippy, like a traditional belt-driven CVT. Can anybody weigh in?
 

the1mrb

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My main concern is how it's gonna feel to drive. Rather than a standard torque converter it has an "eCVT", and I've heard conflicting information on how it behaves. Some say it basically feels like an electric car while others say its sluggish, droney and slippy, like a traditional belt-driven CVT. Can anybody weigh in?
That's assuming it will be connected to the eCVT. The hybrid in the Maverick could be connected to the 8-speed automatic, we don't know for sure yet. But either way, my wife's 2020 Escape Hybrid has the eCVT and I have no complaints. For just doing regular driving a CVT is perfectly fine. I experience no slipping or sluggishness. Put it in sport mode, stomp on the pedal and I feel like it takes off quicker than my Ranger. And with the electric motor in there, the power just keeps pulling you almost constantly through the whole band. Honestly I wouldn't be concerned about having that same eCVT in another hybrid.

In my mind, people saying it's no good either have unrealistic expectations, or already hates CVTs and is just looking for something to be wrong with it.
 

Dan_E26

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Put it in sport mode, stomp on the pedal and I feel like it takes off quicker than my Ranger. And with the electric motor in there, the power just keeps pulling you almost constantly through the whole band. Honestly I wouldn't be concerned about having that same eCVT in another hybrid.
Good to hear some positive thoughts about the hybrid powertrain! I personally can't stand that slipping feeling I get from most CVTs, but as I understand, the eCVT is nothing like the traditional belt-and-pulley setup. Rather, it's two separate electric motors connected in-line with the output from the engine, and a planetary gearset between the motors allows them to create variable ratios. If it's as nice as you say, it's certainly gonna be my first test-drive whenever the Mav hits showrooms.

Since the escape has the eCVT setup, more than likely the Mav will as well, as it seems they're sharing a lot of parts. It's certainly possible they could do some other hybrid system and connect it to the 8-spd, but I doubt it.
 

MontanaEd

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In my youth people always said an automatic in an off roader was a bad choice. You had to have a manual. Now people feel the exact opposite. The majority says an automatic in an off roader is better. I think that is because automatics were not so great in my youth. They were, among other things, less efficient than manuals generally. Now they are in most cases more efficient. There have been some really bad CVTs, no doubt about it. Does that mean all CVTs are bad? Nope. Just like any other combo, the right CVT with the right engine/motor will work very well. Plus, on newer vehicles you are going to have a harder time finding a bad CVT. I had a 2006 Ford Freestyle with a CVT. It worked great until some goofball at the dealership forgot that CVT fluid and automatic transmission fluid are not the same thing. FYI, CVT fluid is blue, automatic transmission fluid is red. Based on my experience with that Freestyle, I have zero concerns about any flavor of CVT in a new vehicle.
 

oljackfrost

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I would like to see just a Hybrid option, not plug in. I have a 2014 Cmax and my overall MPG is 44, which includes driving in winter and summer. From what I understand there is no tax incentive for just the hybrid model.
I wrote my Senators to ask that hybrids be included
 

STDriver03

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I would like to see just a Hybrid option, not plug in. I have a 2014 Cmax and my overall MPG is 44, which includes driving in winter and summer. From what I understand there is no tax incentive for just the hybrid model.
If I understand how a plug-in hybrid works the electric power is used exclusively until a recharge is needed in which case you can either plug in in or have the gas engine kick in to power the vehicle and recharge the batteries, correct? So, for short trips one could often use electric power only and use no gas at all. Considering 90% of my driving is short trips, this sounds pretty good.
 

775533

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Completely dependent on battery size. For example CR-V hybrid has a tiny battery good for only about 1 mile of battery only range. So Honda programmed it to basically only turn on during acceleration.
 

STDriver03

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Completely dependent on battery size. For example CR-V hybrid has a tiny battery good for only about 1 mile of battery only range. So Honda programmed it to basically only turn on during acceleration.
What purpose does that serve? Might as well not be a hybrid at all!
 

oljackfrost

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What purpose does that serve? Might as well not be a hybrid at all!
Theoretically Honda uses a smaller gas engine for increased fuel economy and only kicks in the electric motor for more power. Different way to get higher fuel economy from every other hybrid.
 
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MarcusBrody

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What purpose does that serve? Might as well not be a hybrid at all!
The standard CRV gets 28mpg in the city. The Hybrid gets 40 in the city. If you do a lot of city driving, that's a big difference.

On the other hand, as the battery barely kicks in when driving a consistent speed on the highway, the difference is only 1 mpg (34 vs 35), so it you drive a lot of highway vs. city miles, it likely isn't worth it. It just depends on how you use the vehicle and what is the best fit.
 
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MontanaEd

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I like the way my Volt works. The gas engine is just a generator. The electric motor drives the wheels. When the battery runs out the engine kicks on to make electricity. Just like a diesel electric train engine. It seems like many plug in hybrids work differently and the electric motor is just there to boost the gas engine. Which is how the plug in hybrid Escape works. Seems more complicated that way.
 

Art Vandelay

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I like the way my Volt works. The gas engine is just a generator. The electric motor drives the wheels. When the battery runs out the engine kicks on to make electricity. Just like a diesel electric train engine. It seems like many plug in hybrids work differently and the electric motor is just there to boost the gas engine. Which is how the plug in hybrid Escape works. Seems more complicated that way.
I always wanted a Volt and I'm surprised they never really caught on. It's going to take a while for fully electric vehicles to be practical so PHEVs like the Volt always seemed like the common sense natural progression to all electric vehicles.
 
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