Which do you think will have less problems/ better longevity the hybrid or eco boost?

Delzona

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I have a limited understanding, but I think Atkinson engines have less chance if carbon buildup thank the Otto direct injection engines due to the valves being opened for part of the combustion stroke. I think it exposes gasoline detergent to the injectors.

Also, no turbo.

Also, I think electric motors are probably very durable, especially the brushless kind.

Also, the eCVT seems beautifully simple compared to almost any type of automatic transmission. No pressure fluid pressure, no clutches go wear, no gears to change, no CVT belts.

I believe the most vulnerable part of the whole system is the battery, but that's designed to wear out and is not likely to have catastrophic failure, just inhibit mpg over time.

Here's hoping both prove to be extraordinarily reliable!
I think the Atkinson engine will be providing better power through the Otto direct injection and then with the coupling to the eCVT turning fast enough to produce the 1.21 gigawatts needed for the Flux capacitor! Go Hybrid!!
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huunvubu

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The Maverick Hybrid has these benefits over the gas EcoBoost engine

Ford Maverick Hybrid – No Transmission with CVT Belts
Ford Maverick Hybrid No Starter
Ford Maverick Hybrid – No Alternator
Ford Maverick Hybrid – No Accessory Belts
Ford Maverick Hybrid – No Conventional AC, AC is electric and driven by the High Voltage Battery
Ford Maverick Hybrid – No Turbochargers
 

V2WIN

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The hybrid powertrain has been in production for quite some time and does not have a turbo. I think its easily the more reliable powerplant. imo.
Mike
Turbos giveth, turbos taketh away. Any EB buyers best use full synthetic oil & change it like underwear Turbos no matter who built them cook oil & create sludge that destroys the bearings in the turbo. Hybrid for me please.
 

Gmood1

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Test drove a Honda Insight recently. I must say, the newest hybrid tech makes the transition from electric to gas nearly undetectable!

From reading up on it, seems very close in design to Ford's hybrid tech.

My old hybrid is nothing like it.
You know when it switches over.😂

Power wise, the nod still goes to my old 2012 hybrid. It can actually produce wheel spin, with a better take off when merging onto the highway.
It still has more HP and torque than even the Maverick hybrid.

You'd think they should be able to squeeze more power out of these newer hybrids, without sacrificing much in fuel economy. But maybe not.🤷🏽‍♂️

That Insight is a absolute slug on the road! Fuel economy is awesome though! For in city driving that vehicle would be fantastic!

I'll give reliability to the hybrid for sure!! The fun factor without a doubt, still goes to the EB.
 
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Tulros

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The Maverick Hybrid has these benefits over the gas EcoBoost engine

Ford Maverick Hybrid – No Transmission with CVT Belts
Ford Maverick Hybrid No Starter
Ford Maverick Hybrid – No Alternator
Ford Maverick Hybrid – No Accessory Belts
Ford Maverick Hybrid – No Conventional AC, AC is electric and driven by the High Voltage Battery
Ford Maverick Hybrid – No Turbochargers
My hybrid AC Compressor went out at 5 years and cost $3,000 to repair. Had it been a normal belt driven AC compressor it would have been under $1,000
 

adawalli

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Just wait until those hybrid parts break, and they will. You'll find that there are not generics, they cost a fortune and many mechanics won't touch them. This is coming from a current hybrid owner.
I had an inverter leak from the charger/inverter units. Both parts were $5,000 each... OEM only, no generic. Have fun with that.
I am sorry for your experience, however I really don't believe this represents most Hybrid owners. I've had multiple hybrids and they have all been Rock solid. There's a reason why you still see a lot of Prius generation twos on the road, you just can't kill them.
 

rickon66

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Every CVT equiped vehicle I have ever driven was terrible, especially in hilly or mountainous areas. I don't know which version will be most reliable but I had to go with the turbo, already got that engine in our 2018 Edge and love it.
 

WesM

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Every CVT equiped vehicle I have ever driven was terrible, especially in hilly or mountainous areas. I don't know which version will be most reliable but I had to go with the turbo, already got that engine in our 2018 Edge and love it.
Me, when someone associates prior CVT experiences with an eCVT.

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Rob Cactus Gray

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From a mechanical perspective the Hybrid wins this battle. Less moving parts, less friction, less heat, less wear. Batteries are getting cheaper for Hybrids. My Gen 3 Prius battery OEM Toyota is $2,000 which is down from $4,000 a few years ago. The hybrid is suited for people who drive a lot and have very little need to tow. Hybrid batteries shouldn’t sit for weeks without being driven, or even days at that matter. If you plan to park the Hybrid outside and drive it once a week you may face less reliability. Additionally extreme high temps degrade batteries while cold temps temporarily reduce abilities.

From a user experience the EcoBoost wins. More towing, faster, easy to DIY and funner to drive. These factors weigh in reliability more than just break downs. How many cars have you gotten rid of because they were boring or poor passing power/acceleration to the on ramp? The EcoBoost is better suited (IMHO) for people who drive infrequently, MPG isn’t a concern, towing is required, and/or driving needs to be fun to you. Obviously there are more reasons to buy the EcoBoost but I’m doing a quick comparison.

Both will go the distance, is it worth worrying over? Sure there will be a turbo vs battery war but to what end? Is anyone really going to switch their needs?

By default, far more hybrids will make it to 300k miles. You won’t see many taxi drivers or 200 mile commuters buying the EcoBoost. When these numbers start to surfice in a few (plus) years take it with a grain of salt.

There are exceptions to every rule, some people want to tow their camper every weekend to the lake. So some EcoBoosts will make 300k quickly as well. We just won’t see as many for a long time (if ever).
 

WesM

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Honestly I think it will be a toss up. Hybrid engine will be stressed less, but the hybrid also has an additional system that adds a number of subsystems (eCVT, battery, switches, cooling system etc).

The other thing to think about is what are the cost of repairs? Once out of warranty, even if the Hybrid has fewer issues, one electric AC unit is typically $2500-3k to replace, vs $1000 on a standard ICE vehicle. Replacing the HVB is going to be on the same cost level as replacing an engine or transmission. A lot of those high millage Hybrid taxies you read about in NY have had their HVB replaced at least once.

The other thing in the back of my mind is I wonder how this will effect the used market, am I going to get significantly less when I go to trade in an 8 year old Hybrid Maverick vs an Ecoboost Maverick?

Having said all of that... I ordered a Hybrid Maverick! We will see if the gamble pays off.
 

oljackfrost

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Every CVT equiped vehicle I have ever driven was terrible, especially in hilly or mountainous areas. I don't know which version will be most reliable but I had to go with the turbo, already got that engine in our 2018 Edge and love it.
Do some research on the forum, the Maverick does not have a conventional cvt, it is entirely different.
 

Rob Cactus Gray

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Honestly I think it will be a toss up. Hybrid engine will be stressed less, but the hybrid also has an additional system that adds a number of subsystems (eCVT, battery, switches, cooling system etc).

The other thing to think about is what are the cost of repairs? Once out of warranty, even if the Hybrid has fewer issues, one electric AC unit is typically $2500-3k to replace, vs $1000 on a standard ICE vehicle. Replacing the HVB is going to be on the same cost level as replacing an engine or transmission. A lot of those high millage Hybrid taxies you read about in NY have had their HVB replaced at least once.

The other thing in the back of my mind is I wonder how this will effect the used market, am I going to get significantly less when I go to trade in an 8 year old Hybrid Maverick vs an Ecoboost Maverick?
Points to remember.

1. Standard hybrid. Economies of scale help bring costs down considerably for all components. I know it is a pipe dream but I hope we can upgrade the Hybrid to a PHEV down the road.
2. Salvage units will be readily available with good used parts.
3. Resale value for equivalent 2006-2010 Escape Hybrid vs regular is about the same.
 
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