NavyBob

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Your comment above indicates you may know, but for others, from MWS:
" Square magnet wire is useful where space constraints are concerned. When formed into a coil an equivalent amount of square wire put in a coil can be placed in a tighter coil configuration than the same amount of round wire. This enables engineers to create compact coils and small motors that deliver more power in less space. "

coil-wire-dense-pack-round-square.png
That depends on the surface area of the square vs round wire.
 

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The real question is what else is updated over the initial Gen4 hybrids like mine? No point in adding motor power if you're not adding inverter capacity. The Maverick needs higher limits than 35kW braking and 20kW EV (before ICE turns on at high HVB charge) for any of this to matter much to the driver.
 

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As someone who has never driven an Escape hybrid with eCVT, can someone give me a general description of how they drive? I'm used to 5 or 6 speed automatics. My order is for an XLT hybrid because I could benefit from the 40mpg on my daily commute (Tundra only gets 11-12mpg). Thanks,
 
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As someone who has never driven an Escape hybrid with eCVT, can someone give me a general description of how they drive? I'm used to 5 or 6 speed automatics. My order is for an XLT hybrid because I could benefit from the 40mpg on my daily commute (Tundra only gets 11-12mpg). Thanks,
I can't help you with how they drive...but for me, if the difference was between 11/12 MPG and 40 MPG....I wouldn't care if it drove like a model A!
 

adawalli

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As someone who has never driven an Escape hybrid with eCVT, can someone give me a general description of how they drive? I'm used to 5 or 6 speed automatics. My order is for an XLT hybrid because I could benefit from the 40mpg on my daily commute (Tundra only gets 11-12mpg). Thanks,
You don't get any hard shiftpoints, it's just sort of infinitely smooth
 

vap0rtranz

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You don't get any hard shiftpoints, it's just sort of infinitely smooth
Yup. I owned the 2nd Gen Hybrid Escape (transaxel was made outside Ford at the time). You felt no shifting.

There's pros & cons. Pro: no Overdrive to turn on/off. Con: no 2nd gear to shift into for crawling out of slippery snow.

Supposedly the new drive modes (Tow/Haul & Snow) will help with that by adjusting the transaxel & braking but that didn't exist in Gen2 transaxels.
 

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Yup. I owned the 2nd Gen Hybrid Escape (transaxel was made outside Ford at the time). You felt no shifting.

There's pros & cons. Pro: no Overdrive to turn on/off. Con: no 2nd gear to shift into for crawling out of slippery snow.

Supposedly the new drive modes (Tow/Haul & Snow) will help with that by adjusting the transaxel & braking but that didn't exist in Gen2 transaxels.
There is a "low" button in the middle of the shifter. Not sure what that does exactly on an eCVT though...
 

oljackfrost

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As someone who has never driven an Escape hybrid with eCVT, can someone give me a general description of how they drive? I'm used to 5 or 6 speed automatics. My order is for an XLT hybrid because I could benefit from the 40mpg on my daily commute (Tundra only gets 11-12mpg). Thanks,
Here is a video of a road test vs a Rav 4 from Canada. It should give you a general idea. Spoiler alert, they liked the Rav 4 better but you can see they were pre-disposed to choose it.
 

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The real question is what else is updated over the initial Gen4 hybrids like mine? No point in adding motor power if you're not adding inverter capacity. The Maverick needs higher limits than 35kW braking and 20kW EV (before ICE turns on at high HVB charge) for any of this to matter much to the driver.
Sport Mode should help
 

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That L gear has been brought up by Escape & Fusion Hybrid owners. They say the affect on driving in L feels like harder braking. The owner's manual says it's meant for engine braking but owners say this "braking" happens even without the ICE running. My guess is: L gear adjusts the regenerative braking to engage earlier/harder. I drive a Chevy Volt that has an L gear and we call it "one pedal driving" because you let off the accelerator and the regenerate brakes kick in. So L will probably not help low speed / high torque like traditional ICE tranny gearing.
 

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"one pedal driving"
I describe it as "hydrostatic mode" which owners of lawn tractors will recognize. Yes, it's regen braking at work, so you can't actually stop.
As someone who has never driven an Escape hybrid with eCVT, can someone give me a general description of how they drive? ...
For me, the biggest change was the lack of shifting, and associated engine speed changes. I grew up on manual trannys and I never stopped listening for shift points. The ICE in a hybrid is a "stationary engine" where RPM changes are rare allowing for more efficient ICE design. (Atkinson cycle engines don't "rev" very well.)

From a stop, acceleration will be slower because you're not in a 14 : 1 first gear. In fact, the hybrid always runs in ~6th gear (of the 8-speed), even from a stop. It's not as fast to 30 mph, but top gear passing is a fraction of a second behind the 2.0L EcoBoost. Passing and merging difference will be hard to notice.

Acceleration is smoother, but also longer duration. You start off slow, and folks pass you... but they'll back off the gas while your speed just keeps on rising. Stop lights and traffic are great equalizers; those who pass me frequently end up behind me.

You can play the "Hybrid Game." See how fast you can drive and still get great mileage.
- the car is designed for "pulse and glide" operation, pulse is an ICE burn, glide is the EV run that follows.
- use ICE to speed up and climb hills, and you'll find it generates a lot of HVB charge, too, enabling the EV run.
- use EV to maintain speed while going downhill, and repeat as HVB and terrain require
- learn to "blip off-throttle" so the ICE stops and the car switches to EV mode
- watch the EV Coach display. The bar is what you ask for, the blue outline, what EV can deliver.
- from a stop, learn to "chase blue" by staying in EV mode as the blue outline grows with speed.
- when cruising in EV, learn to reduce power demand as EV-Available outline shrinks to lengthen EV runs.
 

vap0rtranz

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I describe it as "hydrostatic mode" which owners of lawn tractors will recognize.
Ah, I have an old hydrostatic Cub Cadet daily driver. Nice. 1st I've heard L gear described like that.
 

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I owned a Honda Accord Hybrid and it got great gas mileage, but the driving experience was less than satisfying. High engine noise and what I can best describe as an “over revving” sensation from the CVT.

My current vehicle is a Subaru Outback. It’s a standard gas engine with a CVT transmission. It has “fake” shift points that mimic a traditional automatic transmission. Some people hate it, but I like it… a very pleasant driving sensation.

I’m hoping my Maverick Hybrid drives more like the Subaru and less like the Honda.
 

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As someone who has never driven an Escape hybrid with eCVT, can someone give me a general description of how they drive? I'm used to 5 or 6 speed automatics. My order is for an XLT hybrid because I could benefit from the 40mpg on my daily commute (Tundra only gets 11-12mpg). Thanks,
Best thing to do is go drive one.
 
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