Two Door Single Cab

FutureOwnerInTN

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Simple Answer: As of now nobody really knows. Everything we have seem from spy shots shows the crew cab.

Speculative Answer: Statistically in North America the number of single cab truck sales has declined every year. People are using their trucks a lot differently than they used to. That's not to say that there are a number of people who want the single cab option for their personal truck & id think the commercial market would want one for cost/use. This forum has a good number of people who want one. The only glimmer of hope would be the idea that this may also become a truck that is produced for South America & who knows where else. The foreign countries do seem to prefer a smaller truck with a single cab/crew cab. Today the smallest trucks produced for North America [Ranger, Tacoma, Colorado/Canyon, Frontier] only offer an extended cab & crew cab option. I always suggest those that want on voice this to whoever they can. This forum & others, Local Dealer, Comments on Auto related websites, etc... In looking at the number of people who screamed for the manual option in the Bronco & eventually got it seemed to work. So that does show that Ford is listening. Its not for me, but i do hope those that want one get that option.
 

the1mrb

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In looking at the number of people who screamed for the manual option in the Bronco & eventually got it seemed to work. So that does show that Ford is listening. Its not for me, but i do hope those that want one get that option.
In my pessimistic view, I think the reasoning there is that the Bronco is a staple and icon, so they needed to care more about it and the public perception of it. This truck isn't/won't be; most Ford vehicles aren't. Ford wanted/needed to do the Bronco right with so many eyes watching them. The Bronco is a driver's vehicle; it's purpose is to have fun driving it. A lot of other vehicles are just modes of transportation to get from point A to point B or a piece of equipment to do a job for the most part to most consumers; they aren't necessarily passionate about what they have. Obviously not an all encompassing statement, but you get my meaning hopefully.

I've been running into a similar argument on the next gen (2023) Ranger with my brother. He wants a manual off-road capable vehicle, but there aren't many left obviously. And he's wondering if waiting for the next Ranger to come out will result in it having a manual. I think no, because I don't think Ford is as invested in the Ranger as they are in other vehicles like the Bronco, Mustang, and F-150. Even though it wouldn't be that hard given the Bronco-Ranger platform/powertrain relationship. I hope I'm wrong, but I'm afraid that I won't be. And same goes for the Maverick.

I'm not saying people shouldn't necessarily try, I'm just saying I don't think Ford will be pushed over like they were with the Bronco.

Just my opinion. But I'm a pessimistic person, and I've been wrong before.
 

MauldinMaverick99

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Would like to see a true 2 door option here, but I am sure they will say the market is not going that way. The thing is, if they are really going to support multiple target markets, then the on-demand "gig" environment is perfect for a two door car based truck with a simple bed covering. 95% of the time a driver is alone, and every inch of bed space increases the potential revenue from such a vehicle. Keep the payload in the 1000lbs range so that you do not ransack the Transit Connect Market and you have a winner.
 

FutureOwnerInTN

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In my pessimistic view, I think the reasoning there is that the Bronco is a staple and icon, so they needed to care more about it and the public perception of it. This truck isn't/won't be; most Ford vehicles aren't. Ford wanted/needed to do the Bronco right with so many eyes watching them. The Bronco is a driver's vehicle; it's purpose is to have fun driving it. A lot of other vehicles are just modes of transportation to get from point A to point B or a piece of equipment to do a job for the most part to most consumers; they aren't necessarily passionate about what they have. Obviously not an all encompassing statement, but you get my meaning hopefully.

I've been running into a similar argument on the next gen (2023) Ranger with my brother. He wants a manual off-road capable vehicle, but there aren't many left obviously. And he's wondering if waiting for the next Ranger to come out will result in it having a manual. I think no, because I don't think Ford is as invested in the Ranger as they are in other vehicles like the Bronco, Mustang, and F-150. Even though it wouldn't be that hard given the Bronco-Ranger platform/powertrain relationship. I hope I'm wrong, but I'm afraid that I won't be. And same goes for the Maverick.

I'm not saying people shouldn't necessarily try, I'm just saying I don't think Ford will be pushed over like they were with the Bronco.

Just my opinion. But I'm a pessimistic person, and I've been wrong before.
Makes complete sense. Not trying to give false hope. Its not for me, but id like everyone to get what they want, but in todays market we all know that is usually slim & none. Ford is going to do what's best & inexpensive for them.
 

CO2Ranger

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Simple Answer: As of now nobody really knows. Everything we have seem from spy shots shows the crew cab.

Speculative Answer: Statistically in North America the number of single cab truck sales has declined every year. People are using their trucks a lot differently than they used to. That's not to say that there are a number of people who want the single cab option for their personal truck & id think the commercial market would want one for cost/use. This forum has a good number of people who want one. The only glimmer of hope would be the idea that this may also become a truck that is produced for South America & who knows where else. The foreign countries do seem to prefer a smaller truck with a single cab/crew cab. Today the smallest trucks produced for North America [Ranger, Tacoma, Colorado/Canyon, Frontier] only offer an extended cab & crew cab option. I always suggest those that want on voice this to whoever they can. This forum & others, Local Dealer, Comments on Auto related websites, etc... In looking at the number of people who screamed for the manual option in the Bronco & eventually got it seemed to work. So that does show that Ford is listening. Its not for me, but i do hope those that want one get that option.
I agree with this. However, the largest reason sales have declined for single cabs is that companies have stopped offering them. That's my take on it. I bought an 02 truck, single cab off the lot. Now you have to go through fleet sales to even see one.
 

the1mrb

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I agree with this. However, the largest reason sales have declined for single cabs is that companies have stopped offering them. That's my take on it. I bought an 02 truck, single cab off the lot. Now you have to go through fleet sales to even see one.
That's what a lot of people say who want a regular cab truck. But it's ultimately a "which came first" situation though. Did they get dropped because they weren't being sold, or were they not being sold because they got dropped? Is your claim of corporate coaxing factual or just your theory? Which was the cause and which was the effect? I personally think it would be prudent to see/examine the sales numbers from previous/current trucks that offer(ed) regular cab to really get a factual grasp on this. That way someone could really see if regular cab sales just hit a wall when they were discontinued or if there was a steady petering out right up until they got dropped.

Just to be clear, I have no horse in this race. I'm perfectly fine with gross corporate greed and "market tampering", it happens all the time. I'm also fine with them making a business choice to drop low pulled products.

I personally find regular cab trucks to have too little protected inside space. Even if I was single and had no family, I would still an extended cab to be able to store/carry more gear inside the protected cab.
 

FutureOwnerInTN

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That's what a lot of people say who want a regular cab truck. But it's ultimately a "which came first" situation though. Did they get dropped because they weren't being sold, or were they not being sold because they got dropped? Is your claim of corporate coaxing factual or just your theory? Which was the cause and which was the effect? I personally think it would be prudent to see/examine the sales numbers from previous/current trucks that offer(ed) regular cab to really get a factual grasp on this. That way someone could really see if regular cab sales just hit a wall when they were discontinued or if there was a steady petering out right up until they got dropped.

Just to be clear, I have no horse in this race. I'm perfectly fine with gross corporate greed and "market tampering", it happens all the time. I'm also fine with them making a business choice to drop low pulled products.

I personally find regular cab trucks to have too little protected inside space. Even if I was single and had no family, I would still an extended cab to be able to store/carry more gear inside the protected cab.
I read the theory the other day that since sales were dwindling manufactures decided they could cut cost & make more money by only offering crew cab models. Its a conspiracy theory, but we all know that manufactures are all about making money first & anything else second. I do think that there is a decent amount of people who are holding on to aging trucks because of this issue. Likely not the numbers the manufactures want, but maybe one day they will listen & offer the option. Again i will put my theory of commercial sales out there that could help make the Maverick have a single cab option.
 

FutureOwnerInTN

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MarcusBrody

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Dear FoMoCo, If your listening to these owners that are wanting a single cab please take note of the used market...

This just showed up on my facebook: 2000 Ford Ranger Single Cab, Almost 149K Miles, Almost $6K https://www.jamescorlewautomotive.c...000-Ford-Ranger-XLT-Clarksville-TN/4746259403

...crazy. Im sure it will sell & they will get close to that price.
It's odd. There are multiple old single/extended (with the tiny jump seats) Rangers on my block alone. But my town is also full of new trucks - many of which you can get in single and/or extended but not crew cab formats. I'm not sure I've seen a brand new, single cab truck that appeared to be a private vehicle. Maybe one or two. In my town it's probably 75% crew cab, 23% extended cab, 2% single cab for private trucks. And I'm just assuming that I missed some private single cabs. There is always tons of discussion about it on forums, but it doesn't seem to be selling. Though maybe everyone who wants a single cab wants it because it makes the truck smaller, so it would be more popular on something like the Maverick.
 

illuminance

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PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE Ford offer a single cab option. Do not need or want a crew cab. I would like a longer bed instead. My tiny 1984 Dodge Rampage (yes, I actually have one) has a 64" bed, which is fine. I think the crew cab Mavericks will come in a lot smaller than 64". The main reason I didn't go for the Baja was the ridiculously small bed. I have fallen in love with that 2 door Courrier look. I know I am not alone.
 

Art Vandelay

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Unfortunately I think single cab trucks are going the way of manual transmissions. They can still be found new on some trucks but they are getting closer every model year to becoming obsolete.
 

Buzzard

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If you go back to Illuminance '84 Dodge the country was flooded with single cab small pickup trucks. The Japanese were making them for our big three as well as selling their own. So much so that the US. put a tariff on them. I think it was 25 percent. That killed the little single cab. The government not the buying public killed the single cab truck.

Think about your local contractor, painter, electrician etc. He needs to carry some personal tools and light supplies to the job site. That's who all the sales went to. The little guy who needed a little truck. Those guys are still around, writing on this very forum. Homeowners too, who could use a small truck for the families second vehicle. A commuter during the week and a Home Depot work truck on the weekend.

I think those potential sales are still there.
 

Old Ranchero

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I had 2 Chevy LUV trucks, a 1972 & 1975 that were made by Isuzu. In the early 1980s there was a Plymouth Arrow, and made by Mitsubishi I think. I also had a 1969 Datsun truck, but a couple years later Datsun then introduced the King Cab. I'm pretty sure around this time was when Japanese companies started building factories in the USA to avoid the import tariffs. Nissan Hardbody trucks (circa 1986) were designed in La Jolla CA but I think made in Japan? The Subaru Brat & Baja were shipped from Japan too IIRC.

Despite manufacturers continuing to grow the size of the what we called mini trucks (not full sized) and make them more car-like and claiming they are making what people want, IMO there is still a major market for a smaller than mid-size stripped vehicle. The keys are PRICE and basic functionality along with reliability. I think the real issue from company perspective is they want to maximize profits with the upscale models and share Global Platforms to underpin them - as a result of fall out from 2008 economic meltdown and fewer independant brands left that are still continuing to merge to compete globally. I think the EV startups like Rivian that took over existing US factories might be the right model for revival of gas powered "mini trucks" too, but the fear of government legislating them out of existence probably has investors spooked. Bio and synthetic fuels that burn clean are right around the corner from mass production, and realistically speaking would be the bridge for 10 plus years until full build out of reliable easy access nationwide charging network to make EVs competitive with what we have now.
 
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