Premium or Regular unleaded ??

danduc

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Hi all,

The cost of Regular VS Premium unleaded is almost a deal breaker.I always heard that turbo needed Premium. What fuel does it need? How about Ethanol 10% ?

Thanks
 

oljackfrost

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Hi all,

The cost of Regular VS Premium unleaded is almost a deal breaker.I always heard that turbo needed Premium. What fuel does it need? How about Ethanol 10% ?

Thanks
Not sure about the Maverick, but quite often engines will run fine on regular unleaded, but if you want the maximum output quoted in he specs you'll probably have to burn premium.
 

danduc

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I had bad experience with turbo - namely my first new car - 1987 Plymouth Sundance 2.2L Turbo- It did use Premium unleaded but never got 120K because the turbo died (and the car because of cost).
 

douglas685

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My guess is it will be one of those things where it says 87 is fine, but being a turbo you may get better performance on 91+. Most modern high efficiency turbo engines running 87 are really doing a lot of ecu/timing work to prevent pinging constantly; they're just so good at staying right on the line with 87 most people don't notice. But you might get better throttle performance, etc. out of 91. I'm almost certain e85 is probably not allowed, but 10% or 15% ethanol should be OK. Assuming e15 is available in your area, that's a nice way to get 88 (actually closer to 89) octane for cheap.

Also just as FYI I'm guessing the Atkinson-cycle 2.5l hybrid will be just happy with sipping 87, as it's probably not super high compression.
 
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douglas685

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Also modern turbos are generally more reliable, to around 150k-200k miles plus often times. Not sure beyond that though; they're not invincible.
 

TooManyVehicles

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I had bad experience with turbo - namely my first new car - 1987 Plymouth Sundance 2.2L Turbo- It did use Premium unleaded but never got 120K because the turbo died (and the car because of cost).
LOL. I had a 87 Lebaron GTS Turbo (Hatch) w/manual transmission. Nothing but trouble after 50K or so miles - transmission, turbos, ... My first and last Mopar product.

It took a lot of convincing of myself (because of the above) to go for the 3.5L Eco-boost twin-turbo in the F150 (over the V8). I finally did it because I wanted the truck to tow my 20" trailer + L-series Kubota and the torque on the 3.5L Eco-Boost is just better (than the NA V8). Also my nephew has a 3.5L Eco-boost which has north of 200K miles.

For my F150, I use regular old 87 Octane except when I have a need to tow a heavy load.
 

FirstOnRaceDay

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Hi all,

The cost of Regular VS Premium unleaded is almost a deal breaker.I always heard that turbo needed Premium. What fuel does it need? How about Ethanol 10% ?

Thanks
maverivk can run regular on the turbo no problem. I know plenty of people that do.
but yes if you want that 250hp 270lbft you need to run premium. An I would recommend to run premium after every oil change just to help clean up the engine a little.

I would also suggest doing a e85 tune to it too. (5 star tuning) yes your mpg drops but you gain performance
 

Mark

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My guess is it will be one of those things where it says 87 is fine, but being a turbo you may get better performance on 91+. Most modern high efficiency turbo engines running 87 are really doing a lot of ecu/timing work to prevent pinging constantly; they're just so good at staying right on the line with 87 most people don't notice. But you might get better throttle performance, etc. out of 91. I'm almost certain e85 is probably not allowed, but 10% or 15% ethanol should be OK. Assuming e15 is available in your area, that's a nice way to get 88 (actually closer to 89) octane for cheap.

Also just as FYI I'm guessing the Atkinson-cycle 2.5l hybrid will be just happy with sipping 87, as it's probably not super high compression.
According to the specs the 2.5l hybrid is 13:1 compression ratio.
 
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