Common problems - Are you concerned?

DanMustang70

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I started looking up common problems for the 2.0 Ecoboost and found this article. This sounds like a real problem for a truck that will be doing some towing. Is anyone else concerned? Do you think Ford will address this issue?


2.0 EcoBoost Cracked Exhaust Manifold
Both generations of the 2.0 EB have an integrated exhaust manifold design. The manifold is made of stainless steel and integrated directly into the cylinder head. Note on European version of this engine, the exhaust manifold is not integrated, using a tradition cylinder head with individual exhaust ports and a conventional manifold.

On the 2.0 EB, exhaust gas temps can reach excessive temperatures, especially when towing or driving up grades. The constant heat cycles created by engines and fluctuating temperatures expands and contracts the stainless steel exhaust manifold. When you combine the continuous expansion and contraction with a vibrating engine, the exhaust manifold can form hairline cracks.

When an exhaust manifold cracks, air begins to seep out of the crack instead of flowing out of the exhaust. While this is not healthy for the environment, it also has significant performance and drivability implications. Turbochargers need back-pressure to operate efficiently. When the exhaust manifold cracks, all back-pressure is lost which means the turbo has to work extra hard to produce normal power levels

https://tuningpro.co/ford-2-0-ecoboost-engine-problems/
 
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dp4616

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I am concerned. A little, as you mentioned for towing needs etc. Both engines seem to have a few quirks that need ironing out imo. The internal wet timing BELT on the 1.5l, and this on the 2.0l. I have read many good things about the 2.0 though so I am less worried about that one. This seems like an easy fix though - use the conventional cylinder head from the euro model?
 

Doc

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I started looking up common problems for the 2.0 Ecoboost and found this article. This sounds like a real problem for a truck that will be doing some towing. Is anyone else concerned? Do you think Ford will address this issue?


2.0 EcoBoost Cracked Exhaust Manifold
Both generations of the 2.0 EB have an integrated exhaust manifold design. The manifold is made of stainless steel and integrated directly into the cylinder head. Note on European version of this engine, the exhaust manifold is not integrated, using a tradition cylinder head with individual exhaust ports and a conventional manifold.

On the 2.0 EB, exhaust gas temps can reach excessive temperatures, especially when towing or driving up grades. The constant heat cycles created by engines and fluctuating temperatures expands and contracts the stainless steel exhaust manifold. When you combine the continuous expansion and contraction with a vibrating engine, the exhaust manifold can form hairline cracks.

When an exhaust manifold cracks, air begins to seep out of the crack instead of flowing out of the exhaust. While this is not healthy for the environment, it also has significant performance and drivability implications. Turbochargers need back-pressure to operate efficiently. When the exhaust manifold cracks, all back-pressure is lost which means the turbo has to work extra hard to produce normal power levels

https://tuningpro.co/ford-2-0-ecoboost-engine-problems/
Meh ..
 

the1mrb

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Depends if the light duty towing I'd imagine the Mav will be rated for is actually going to strain the engine at all. Towing 5000lbs with my 2.3L EcoBoost Ranger barely makes it sweat. With the right gearing, like a transmission with many gears, the engine will likely never be outside it's comfort zone.
 
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DanMustang70

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Depends if the light duty towing I'd imagine the Mav will be rated for is actually going to strain the engine at all. Towing 5000lbs with my 2.3L EcoBoost Ranger barely makes it sweat. With the right gearing, like a transmission with many gears, the engine will likely never be outside it's comfort zone.
That makes me feel better. I was concerned the engine might have a built-in design flaw. Reminded me of the BMW engine that would warp the heads because of bad design.
 
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the1mrb

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It also depends what "common" means. Is this something that happens 1 out of every 10 engines, or 1 out of every 10,000,000. Statistics are important. Because if it's the latter, that's not something I feel anyone should be wasting their time and energy worrying about. You have a much higher likelihood of experiencing many more dreadful things. And if it's the former, then Ford would have found it in their exhaustive testing and fixed it.

Another thing to consider is at what point does this happen. Is it after 200 miles of hard towing or 200,000 miles of hard towing. This engine is not made to hard tow consistently for 200,000 miles, that's not it's purpose or what it's designed for. Nor is it what people will/should be using their Mavericks or Bronco Sports for. If they are, then they're operating well outside the set bounds of the system and have earned whatever damage they incur.

As an engineer I've seen way more failures from user error than from faulty design.
 

Gary in NJ

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I'm not a big fan of towing at capacity with a (gasoline) turbocharged engine. I think they are fine for loads of 50% of capacity somewhat regularly, but I would not make a habit of capacity towing with such an engine. If that's your use case, I'd look at a truck with a larger towing capacity. The Bronco Sport with the 2.0T has a towing capacity of 2,200 pounds. I suspect that the Maverick is going to fall somewhere around 3,000. That means that the Maverick will be fine towing a dirtbike trailer or something similar.
 

ElMaverick

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I'm not a big fan of towing at capacity with a (gasoline) turbocharged engine. I think they are fine for loads of 50% of capacity somewhat regularly, but I would not make a habit of capacity towing with such an engine. If that's your use case, I'd look at a truck with a larger towing capacity. The Bronco Sport with the 2.0T has a towing capacity of 2,200 pounds. I suspect that the Maverick is going to fall somewhere around 3,000. That means that the Maverick will be fine towing a dirtbike trailer or something similar.

Why? especially at the lower revs is where turbos come in handy for instant torque
 

Old Ranchero

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what about Torque Steer? Nobody has even mentioned it, but it is inherent negative characteristic of transverse mounted FWD. I can't imagine adding twin turbos not making it worse. I-3 with cylinder deactivation seems un-wise. Only known work arounds are full time AWD or low mounted flat boxer configuration motors like Subaru.
 

Gary in NJ

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Why? especially at the lower revs is where turbos come in handy for instant torque
Because turbos are also good at instant heat. Under towing loads turbos work harder to generate necessary power, which in turn generates additional heat. That heat generated during a long duration can damage the head gasket, cause premature wear to bearings and eats fuel like no V8 can.
 

dano0726

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If that Bronco Sport Badland's 2.0L is available in the Maverick = order this engine (unless maybe a hybrid, depending on specs)...

I finally got to highway drive Wifey's Badlands, and the 2.0L does just fine -- this is our 1st Ford vehicle, and the Badlands feels/handles really well (and planted on the road) with ample torque.
 
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