thad17

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I didn’t breakdown the 1h 41min , but I got in the ball park at 29.43 MPH. Ahhh what are the chances that anyone will drive an average of 29 MPH.

I'm not sure where you live but in South Florida (Miami area) my lifetime average speed in my Kia Niro over 8,000 + miles was 21 MPH and my lifetime MPG was just under 48. Tracked and hand calculated using Fuelly app on my phone. To go 50 miles here in the city would take you anywhere from 2 - 4 hours depending on traffic. It routinely takes me 45 minutes to commute to work 13 miles, and that's when I leave before traffic starts.

Edit: In addition, we are completely flat. The only hills are boat ramps, highway ramps, and landfills. I don't regen anything from hills.
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Randy H.

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I would like to see if the driver kept track of all 1640 miles driven on the Trip 2 log and then see what the overall MPG is over that 1640 miles.
 

thad17

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When you are doing 0 MPH when stopped at Red Lights for minutes or in rush hour traffic 29 MPH average is more than possible.

Seeing that 50% of the total miles traveled were all electric I can sure see being stopped or crawling in rush hour traffic as the main reason for the the 29 MPG and the 50 MPG result.

Too bad there wasn't a Maverick with an EcoBoost going on the same trip together with the Hybrid. The MPG numbers between the two would be interesting.
Yeah, although, this would be embarrassing to the Egoboost haha
 

brnpttmn

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When you are doing 0 MPH when stopped at Red Lights for minutes or in rush hour traffic 29 MPH average is more than possible.

Seeing that 50% of the total miles traveled were all electric I can sure see being stopped or crawling in rush hour traffic as the main reason for the the 29 MPG and the 50 MPG result.

Too bad there wasn't a Maverick with an EcoBoost going on the same trip together with the Hybrid. The MPG numbers between the two would be interesting.
Yeah, we also--as far as I know--have no clue what else he was doing with the vehicle that day. If he was promoing the car to dealers, VIPs, etc around Nashville, it could have easily been sitting "idle" in a few different lots that day rolling 20+ minutes on the trip computer. Nice to see the 50mpg, but all of these dashboard readings are context-free.
 

Erwin_R

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I mean, technically almost all of the Maverick's electric power comes from gasoline (The small exception being down hill regen braking). The point isn't that you're using 'pure' electrical power, but that you're reclaiming gas power that would have otherwise been wasted by heating your brake pads or idling your engine.
All of the electrical power in hybrids come from gasoline. They use gasoline to get to the top of the hill then get "some" back through rengen braking. Even if they used electricity to get to the top of the hill at some point the battery was charged from gasoline created motion.

A plug-in hybrid can get power from the electrical grid without the use of gasoline.

Jon
 

KeinoDoggy

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All of the electrical power in hybrids come from gasoline. They use gasoline to get to the top of the hill then get "some" back through rengen braking. Even if they used electricity to get to the top of the hill at some point the battery was charged from gasoline created motion.

A plug-in hybrid can get power from the electrical grid without the use of gasoline.

Jon
Well mostly, but not completely correct. When the car goes down hill, the electric drive motor switches to generator mode and charges the battery also.
 

brnpttmn

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Well mostly, but not completely correct. When the car goes down hill, the electric drive motor switches to generator mode and charges the battery also.
But at some point the gas engine needed to produce the kinetic energy for the regen. A HEV is powered entirely by gas. It's just a lot more efficient because the hybrid powertrain conserves, stores, and reuses a lot of that power.
 

clavicus

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Well mostly, but not completely correct. When the car goes down hill, the electric drive motor switches to generator mode and charges the battery also.
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adawalli

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Yeah, we also--as far as I know--have no clue what else he was doing with the vehicle that day. If he was promoing the car to dealers, VIPs, etc around Nashville, it could have easily been sitting "idle" in a few different lots that day rolling 20+ minutes on the trip computer. Nice to see the 50mpg, but all of these dashboard readings are context-free.
If you are not adding miles to the trip(idling), you aren't helping the MPG rating - so actually, it would be way more impressive if he was "idling" a lot throughout the day. I seriously doubt that is the case here though.
 

Bill Cather

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I'm not sure where you live but in South Florida (Miami area) my lifetime average speed in my Kia Niro over 8,000 + miles was 21 MPH and my lifetime MPG was just under 48. Tracked and hand calculated using Fuelly app on my phone. To go 50 miles here in the city would take you anywhere from 2 - 4 hours depending on traffic. It routinely takes me 45 minutes to commute to work 13 miles, and that's when I leave before traffic starts.

Edit: In addition, we are completely flat. The only hills are boat ramps, highway ramps, and landfills. I don't regen anything from hills.
Oh, I understand traffic having lived and retired out of Washington DC…2hrs =30 mi (btw Phoenix is getting there)
I was addressing the the non-rush hour everyday traveling
 

adawalli

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My point was.....the battery does get charged at times by the electric motor, not just by regenerative braking. got it?
I think their point, though, is that it it is always 100% originated from gas. It just converted back and forth from gas to electrical to battery storage (all of which have losses)...but all FROM gasoline at the start.
 

KeinoDoggy

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I think their point, though, is that it it is always 100% originated from gas. It just converted back and forth from gas to electrical to battery storage (all of which have losses)...but all FROM gasoline at the start.
I agree with the part about the gas engine is the reason. However my point was in reference to the statement that ""some" back through rengen braking". Not just braking as the motor acts as a generator to also charge the battery.
 

buckaroo

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Not just braking as the motor acts as a generator to also charge the battery.
Doggy, you got it right, that regenerative braking plays a very minor role. The main charge comes from the gas engine, the braking deal is just an added bonus. Hybrid is truly the future, always was until the b.s. got shove down our collective throat's.

Then we discovered why as China builds one new coal plant every six months and nuclear energy is now acceptable in the backyard. Meanwhile Elon is burring all the junk batteries out in the desert, thankfully in China he doesn't have to worry about all that. :)
 
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